“new retired lego sets +why are legos so expensive”

If you are like me, and have a lot of loose parts in your own collection that you want to use it putting together a set, the process can be daunting. So it is a good idea to first have your own LEGO collection sorted and stored property. Thanks to my wife’s help, our LEGO elements are sorted first by color then by part type. So a great way for me to start pulling parts for the project is to change the filter options on the BrickLink Wanted List to show by color rather than piece type. This allows me to work through several colors, then have the option of stopping at any time.
Decide how much you are willing to spend on each lot.  If the lot includes minifigs, estimate the figures at $1 each (general minifigs resell for approximately $3).  If the lot includes castle minifigs or Star Wars minifigs, figure the price higher.  Calculate the rest of the Legos at about $8 to $10 per pound.  If it includes Star Wars or Castle specialty pieces, the price will be higher.  Just look at other auctions that are about to end and you’ll see what the going price is.
Since the company’s beginning in 1932, Lego has grown to be the world’s third largest toy manufacturer, and for good reason. No child or adult can resist creating their favorite monuments, figurines, ships, carousels, and many more! As for the Lego set collectors who love Star Wars, the Millennium Falcon set will keep your Jedi impulses at bay while you’re out in public. If you prefer Batman, then “Holy Cow!” you have to allow yourself to have a ball with the Batcave set! If you just want a good ‘ol pirate-ey time, then land your ship and drop your anchor on the Skull’s Eye Schooner set. Interestingly, the Lego name is derived from the two Danish words “Leg” and “Godt,” which means “play well,” and so you should.
Why would LEGO discontinue sets that are still insanely popular? Example being the UCS Millenium Falcon. It would obviously still sell, look at the prices it is commanding online now. Seems to me LEGO is giving up profits. I know some people buy sets hoping the price will rise, and that is all well and good, but some of us just really enjoy assembling, displaying and looking at our collections. I am like a few others in here that have an entire room devoted to LEGO. I have sets I could sell but honestly I probably never will. I find myself alot just sitting there looking around at my sets and honestly it really relaxes me. Same with building. I am married and have 5 daughters…..yes….DAUGHTERS and when I am building I can just focus on that and ignore the chaos around me. It is very theraputic. Anyways, I got a little side tracked, as far as my original question does anyone know why LEGO would intentionally stop the most popular sets, and what are your opinions about this? Also, and I know no one can know for sure, but what do you think the chances are that they would ever re-release the UCS sets?
Clean your LEGO pieces. You don’t need to scrub each piece, but a quick wash in warm water and dish soap will add value to your LEGO lot. Put them in a storage tub with enough warm water to cover them. Add some soap and stir them around a bit. Let them soak a while and stir them a few more times. Drain, rinse, and spread them out on a towel to air dry. Stir them up a few times on the towel so the water drains better. Mention in your listing that you have cleaned them. If you have no pets or smokers in your home, mention this as well.
It is 100% complete with all minifigs, weapons, and accessories, as well as the instruction manual. The cover to the manual has separated from the rest of the pages and some of the pages are “split” d…
If find the challenges of putting together a set fun in itself. I’m currently putting together 10231 Space Shuttle Explorer, 10197 Fire Station, 8480 Technic Space Shuttle and 6395 Victory Raceway (which I desperately wanted, but never owned as a kid). I could easily buy them on eBay or elsewhere, but the challenge of this is far more interesting.
I have most of what I want off this list. A few have remained maybe’s on the list for a long time. Two sets I would possible consider a second copy of would be Wall-E and Pet Shop. But I think I’ll save the money for some of those large sets that came out this year. Still debating on that gorgeous Disney Castle.
Judith, individual sellers could be getting their stock from various places. We do get regular sales on Dimensions sets – usually 50% off, sometimes more. Also, the dollar is pretty strong now compared to the pound, so there is that as well. I also shop from international sellers from time to time. European sellers usually have a much better stock on rare parts and colors. 🙂
I know some sets can be out be out for years and the average is around 18 months, but it hasn’t even been 6 months on these sets. Were these sets not received, getting upgrades soon (for Dr Strange in Civil War), or what?
When searching for bulk Legos for resale, do a search for “Lego pounds” or “Lego lbs” or “Bulk Lego”, etc.  If a lot looks good, check the seller’s feedback.  If it is 100%, mark the lot as an item to be watched (you’ll find the link in the upper right corner of the listing).  Once you have five or six lots, go to your “My Ebay” page.  The lots will be listed there. 
Thanks to Steven Morin for emailing in about this as a reminder. On LEGO Shop@home you can now search for sets that are due to be retired soon. Most are this year’s sets that only have a year’s shelf life, but if you want to complete a certain theme it can at least give you an idea of what you need to get first. However, it’s the exclusives on the list that will interest most of us and as we predicted the other month there are some big sets going out by the end of 2015.
Fair enough, and before the internet I think that would be a valid point. I personally cannot see how paying more makes collecting more fun? Its not like you work harder (other than for your money) to buy it. Instead of buying from one web site you just buy from another.
The first step in putting together an old LEGO set is making sure you can get your hands on the instructions. Some people are happy to just download the instructions to their computer from an online source, others buy the original instruction booklets on BrickLink or eBay. If the set is really valuable, the instruction booklets will be expensive also, so you may just want to stay with downloadable instructions. You can find instructions for all recently released LEGO sets on LEGO’s own website. And there are also other websites that catalog the instructions for older LEGO sets. No matter which way you go, it helps to have the exact LEGO set number to find the instruction you want. The instructions are the key piece of putting together any LEGO set, so before you do anything else you need to make sure you get this.
Sometimes even LEGO fans would like to sell their LEGO collection, or part of their collection. This may be due to not having enough room, moving, financial challenges, loosing interest in the hobby (hope not!) or just wanting to free up room for new LEGO sets. 😉
Stir the pieces around once an hour. Stirring the small pieces around with a stick or gloved hand will dislodge the bubbles causing them to float. Try this every hour or so for best results. If you leave pieces floating too long, they can develop a cloudy white marking along the water line.[6]
I think you will find it doesn’t change too much. It’s a single outlier in the data set, and likely counter-balanced by two other outliers in Obi Wan’s Jedi Starfighter and the UCS B-Wing, which both had shorter than usual lifespans.

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