“lego rescue -lego gold”

We don’t often see a LEGO® set like the new 42055, the Bucket Wheel Excavator. LEGO® boasts this as the largest Technic set ever made. It is a new 2016 set and it is made up of 3929 pieces. So, Read more »
The Spider-Car is all that stands between Spider-Man™ and his arch-nemesis, Venom™, who wants to destroy the city! Build the car for some fast-paced fun. This Easy to Build set is a great way to grow your child’s skills. Watch as they st more
After reading a couple of interesting posts I thought I would toss my own thoughts on what the Lego.com retiring soon moniker means to me.  To me this is definitely going to be the bane of the secondary market in time.  It indicates to everyone interested in Lego that their time is nearly up to purchase particular sets.  It also indicates to resellers that the time to buy is now.  I’m sure there will be the usual procrastinators inside of there yet, but I think overall less.  I think that for every one person who buys one knowing that a set will soon be retired there will be another reseller buying two of them to hopefully sell to the person that missed that time window.  If Lego stays on top of and consistent with their labeling of sets ‘retiring soon’ it will definitely start to take the steam out of the secondary market and make buying and holding a regular occurrence with the majority of sets.  (this is not meant to be a bubble thread)  I apologize in advance if it somehow evolves into that or an ethical debate.  Overall this doesn’t bother me, just one of those things I’ve given a moments thought to.
Now that he has it open, it is a VERY impressive Lego set with 24 “little men” as they’re called in our house. There are not just bags of Legos but boxes of Legos at it is such a large set with over 3,800 pieces. The directions are in a spiral bound book, which make the task of putting the set together look daunting, but he’s loving it. I’m loving that here it is mid-January and he’s still putting it together.
Follow these instructions at your own risk. LEGO customer service warns against using washing machines due to the risk of damage from heat or tumbling.> Many LEGO bricks have emerged from the machine unharmed, but that is not necessarily true for your bricks and your washing machine.[3]
Whether you’re a huge Star Wars fan or not, the name “Millennium Falcon” has definitely crossed your eardrum. Originally a cargo vessel designed to lug around cargo until it was heavily, and illegally, modified to become the ship everyone now knows to be modest, but very powerful. For the Lego collectors looking for the best Lego Star Wars sets, this one is a steal. Many reviews of the product state that the finished product, “… looks exactly like the Millennium Falcon. Every little detail visible in the movie is present on the model.”
The large scale figurines can be hit or miss, honestly.  Some of them can really get so far away from the classic Lego minifigurine that they can feel pretty far off for a Lego traditionalist.  However, even for a grumpy minifiguring fanboy, it is easy to see the appeal when they get it right.  A shining example is the Scout Trooper and Speeder Bike set.  The Speeder is of course one of the coolest vehicles in the original trilogy, landing in Return of the Jedi’s Battle of Endor.  The speeder features a spring-loaded shooter and a few other cool details like movable flaps.  The Speeder is sturdy and the Trooper fits on quite well with the handlebars and foot rests seating him nicely.  This is a set that can handle some action, it is light, lean, and fun.  Not the most challenging or lengthy build out there, but the end result is a must have for any Star Wars fan.
You’ve put way more though into this than have. Since there is a lack of white bearded faces, I was considering Count Duku?’s face for president Snow. I got it some time ago but I can’t quite remember how and maybe use BrickForge hero hair in white.
Judith, the discrepancy in sales usually has to do with what each region has in stock, and also what does and doesn’t sell well. The US market is very different from the market in the UK. We get our LEGO sets from the factory in Mexico (mostly), while you guys get them from mainland Europe (Denmark, Hungary, the Czech Republic). What sells well here may not sell well in the UK, and vice versa. There are even sets that only appear in a certain region based on market research and demand. It is normal for companies to have different strategies for different markets, based on extensive market research.
Lando Calrissian’s floating city of Bespin is one of the smaller classic Star Wars sets, but where else can you find a “working” carbon freezing chamber? With four distinct “play areas” and a star-studded mini-figure collection, you would be hard-pressed to have a bad feeling about this minimal set.
If you want to see what sells well, check out Brick Picker—it’s the industry clearinghouse. Its forums and price guide are the best resource online. “It’s just like the stock market,” Maciorowski says, repeating his mantra. “You’ve got to do your research.”
Lego, like any company, has to periodically thin their line in order to make room for new sets. Production of parts can only occur at a particular rate and if too many sets are in production, they can’t meet the production of them all. Additionally, there’s only so much life that molds have and some sets which use unique molds are not likely to be continued beyond the lifespan of the mold. Once it breaks, they have to weigh the time and cost of replacing them to the time and money they will spend doing so as opposed to the money that could be made making a new mold for a new set altogether.
” Get busy loading the cargo at the LEGO City Cargo Terminal. view larger LEGO Cargo Terminal It’s another busy day at the LEGO City Cargo Terminal. There’s plenty of cargo to load and unload and the cargo plane is ready for take-off. LEGO fans ages 6… more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *