“retired lego sets 2015 |retired lego series”

Bring your architectural creations to life in LEGO form with LEGO Architecture Studio. In this amazing set you get over 1200 LEGO bricks and an inspirational guidebook filled with 272 pages of tips, t…
Finally, at the risk of sounding like a shill for Lego, the Creator section of the Lego website has a nice collection of short videos that feature their own designers explaining advanced building techniques. These videos mesh nicely with this set.
As thehornedrat says, I may have to succumb to lepin for the opera house set along with the Taj Mahal and the very early modulars which I missed. I refuse to pay the prices being asked on eBay for these sets because A, I can’t afford it and B, I think these investors who stockpile sets to try and mug people off by making huge profits when they retire are worse than lepin.
“As with any sort of collectible, the safe storage of the collectible is very important,” Ed Mack explains in a piece on How to make money from Lego . “Although actual Lego brick is pretty much indestructible under normal conditions, the Lego boxes and instructions need special care.”
Another important tip is to just ask for stuff they want.  Make sure you give the G-Parents the product number too.  Try looking up LEGO Creator House and see what happens.  Be kind and give the number.
The LEGO DUPLO All-In-One Box of Fun set has a whole load of DUPLO bricks for fun building and rebuilding for creative play. At its heart is a buildable wagon base with rounded edges and wheels that really turn. This comprehensive set also includes 2… more
Our first entry from Rogue One, Krennic’s shuttle offers a fun build of the Imperial starship belonging to the most hated character in the great Rogue One movie.  Along with a great Krennic minifiguring, you get a K-2S0 droid, two Imperial Death Troopers, Pao, and Bodhi Rook.  The attention to detail on the minifigurines is great, the K-2S0 is a personal favorite.  Our favorite part about this build is that is just looks cool.  The design is a sleek, black pyramid shape which makes it stand out even among some iconic Star Wars startships.  Being able to move the massive wings is a joy.  The ship comes with a couple of spring loaded blasters which are always a plus in our book.  The build for this set isn’t terribly long, but remains fun.  Krennic’s shuttle might not be canon in the Star Wars universe, but this is a great set and worth checking out.
In addition to the rationale of logistical supply chain that people are mentioning for the discontinuation of sets, I thought I should point out that the collector’s market after a set is retired is skewing our perspective with respect to what the demand was while the set was in production.
“Build the highly detailed LEGO Star Wars X-wing Starfighter with folding wings, opening cockpit, display stand and R2-D2! Collect and create the most highly detailed LEGO Star Wars X-wing Starfighter ever produced. This iconic starfighter is featured… more
Fantastic set. I love the creator line for their versatility. I remember old Lego products having ‘alternate’ configurations in photos on the box/instructions, but no instructions on building those variations.
The amazingly detailed battle station features loads of moving parts and minifigs that will have your Star Wars heart racing with joy. And with 3803 pieces, you’ll be able to spend a lot of time and devotion to the ultimate Death Star playset.
Probably a silly question, but can’t Judith buy from the US site? I’ve often wondered. I grew up in Germany and England, so the regional sets would interest me. A central site offering all sets to everyone would be nice.
Lego, like any company, has to periodically thin their line in order to make room for new sets. Production of parts can only occur at a particular rate and if too many sets are in production, they can’t meet the production of them all. Additionally, there’s only so much life that molds have and some sets which use unique molds are not likely to be continued beyond the lifespan of the mold. Once it breaks, they have to weigh the time and cost of replacing them to the time and money they will spend doing so as opposed to the money that could be made making a new mold for a new set altogether.
However, what really bugs me are these sets. That is why it can be challenged as an educational toy because I’ve seen kids just build and not build some more. While I admire the themes and are just as wowed as you are when your child builds a complex set, I can’t help but think that we are not getting as much as we should be getting from LEGO.  I really wish it was more about the plain bricks. Did you happen to see Fat Brain Toys blog post showing nostalgic LEGO ads. I loved it!
Build it with a kid – hopefully your own. My 5-year-old and I built the second one. With guidance, he’s able to actually be helpful. And, he asks a lot of questions about what parts are and why they are important. I love telling the stories as we build and watching a few clips.
Whether it’s Brian’s Toys, a friend, or someone who responds to your add through Craigslist who will resell the sets for you, they will have to have enough wiggle-room to be able to make the deal profitable and worth their time.
This is a pretty crazy looking set.  Taken from Attack of the Clones, this set pieces together Obi-Wan’s Starfighter with an impressive hyperdrive module.  The hyperdrive is a blast to play with.  It has a dock for the Starfighter, two spring-loaded shooters and a quick release for the Starfighter.  The Startfighter itself isn’t going to blow you away, but it is a sleek little ship that is very well designed and a fun build.  Not as fun as the hyperdrive, but fun nonetheless.  One of our favorite features of this set are the minifigurines.  Of course Obi-Wan is included, but you also get Jango Fett and a young Boba, which is fantastic.  Rounding out the characters is a R4-P17 droid which docks on the Starfighter.  The build isn’t as lengthy as some others here, but it isn’t exactly a quick task either.  The overall fantastic visual appeal makes this set shine, but the smaller details really set it apart.
Twenty-two years after Star Wars was released, LEGO and Lucasfilm worked together to produce products in time for the release of Episode I in May 1999. The first sets were released under the LEGO System brand and consisted of eight sets from Episode I and five sets (13 in total) from the original trilogy films, including the first LEGO Star Wars X-wing (#7140) and Snowspeeder (#7130). Both of these sets have been revisited again many times in minifigure scale, MINI or even Ultimate Collectors Series (UCS) form — each new release bringing new features, new minifigures and new colored bricks and pieces too.
There are tricks to filling the cup so that you maximize your purchase. For instance, fill the little rim at the bottom with tiny pieces, then add your large, expensive pieces, then add smaller and smaller pieces. Top off the cup with the itty-bitty pieces that shake down into the crevices.
Released in this year, the Super Star Destroyer is a classic Star Wars Ultimate Collector’s Series set that boasts a whopping 3152 pieces! It includes a redesigned IG-88 and Dengar and a new minifigure, Admiral Piett, along with a Darth Vader minifigure. Weighing in at 8 pounds, this set will definitely be a gem in your LEGO Star Wars collection…but it will cost you, as it’s selling for $500 and up!

One Reply to ““retired lego sets 2015 |retired lego series””

  1. So now that we’re at the stage where we have a budget and we are convinced that this is a good idea that won’t break the bank, it’s time to get organized. For this I recommend using some of the tools on BrickLink. You can part out the set into a wanted list by clicking the Part Out link on the set’s page. Here we can choose various options like do we want minifigures listed as fully assembled, do we want to be notified when new items get listed, do we want boxes and instruction-manuals in our list, etc. I also like to make the minimum quantity wanted the same as what is on the list. That way I know how much is needed without having to look up the set every time.
    A couple of tips I’ve picked up – watch postage fees! When putting together an order I make sure I keep the postage cost per part to a minimum. I start with the uncommon parts a seller has, then using the cheapest/common parts I need, bulk up the order so that the number of parts makes the postage per part tiny.
    Your LEGO Hero Factory fan will be thrilled to add this VOLTIX figure to a LEGO collection. The LEGO Hero Factory VOLTIX Play Set has 61 pieces which can be used to create VOLTIX, a seven inch tall figure from the Hero Factory. With highly flexible and… more

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