Attention then shifts to construction of the three aircraft. When I first spied this set I assumed that the two red jets were the same, but closer examination reveals a number of differences. First up is a red jet with a canard wing configuration as seen in the Saab Viggen amongst others. The lower fuselage is fashioned from a number of double and triple inverted 45 degree slopes with a pair of 1 x 14 Technic bricks running through the centre; there’s no obvious reason for Technic bricks to be used in this situation – standard 1 x 14 bricks would have done the job just as well - so I assume that LEGO just happened to have a bunch of them lying around…. A printed black 1 x 2 tile in the cockpit represents the instrument panel, while a substantial air intake is attached on either side of the fuselage at a 90 degree angle by way of brackets.
I’m pleased to report that I thoroughly enjoyed building this set, and what’s more I quite enjoyed playing with it afterwards as well…. First and foremost it’s an excellent play set – it’s not often that you get three good-sized vehicles plus a large building and a number of accessories in a single set at this price point. Furthermore, all three aircraft are actually pretty good, particularly the two jets which look really sleek apart from their prominent cockpit canopies. The jets are also solidly built, surprisingly weighty, and eminently swooshable; you can conveniently grab them by their lateral air intakes and nothing falls off when you swoosh them around - I know this as I extensively tested this particular play feature…. The hanger is admittedly a bit insubstantial, but overall this set lived up to my expectations and I’ll certainly be picking up a couple more of the Airport sets this summer.
The build itself is good fun, as it should be, and engaging enough to be interesting. The only thing that I started to find a little boring was the Airport Control Tower, but then its top redeemed it. Naturally, the best thing to build is the Giant Man figure. The techniques used to make it posable, like a regular Lego minifigure, were brilliantly thought out. I hope to see more like this, perhaps in a Galactus set, although I doubt that’ll ever happen.

SAS is a member of Star Alliance, meaning that many of their flights are code-shared or can be interlined with local Star Alliance partners. Therefore, you can take advantage of a one-ticket flight to, from, or via Copenhagen even if your origin or destination is not directly served by SAS. Norwegian is not a member of any alliance, but they offer connecting flights from Copenhagen to their European destinations on one ticket with an intercontinental flight.
Since 1963, Lego pieces have been manufactured from a strong, resilient plastic known as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS).[12][30] As of September 2008, Lego engineers use the NX CAD/CAM/CAE PLM software suite to model the elements. The software allows the parts to be optimised by way of mould flow and stress analysis. Prototype moulds are sometimes built before the design is committed to mass production. The ABS plastic is heated to 232 °C (450 °F) until it reaches a dough-like consistency. It is then injected into the moulds at pressures between 25 and 150 tonnes, and takes approximately 15 seconds to cool. The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to twenty micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected.[33] Human inspectors check the output of the moulds, to eliminate significant variations in colour or thickness. According to the Lego Group, about eighteen bricks out of every million fail to meet the standard required.[37] Lego factories recycle all but about 1 percent of their plastic waste from the manufacturing process. If the plastic cannot be re-used in Lego bricks, it is processed and sold on to industries that can make use of it.[38][39] Lego has a self-imposed 2030 deadline to find a more eco-friendly alternative to the ABS plastic it currently uses in its bricks.[40]
The first few bags build the small truck with carts that you see on airport runways. The truck has a "follow me" sign that I confess I have not seen at any airport. There is also a fueling tank and a rolling staircase that sits next to the plane to allow for boarding. Both the tank and the staircase are additional carts for the truck, though I am guessing not both at the same time.
Anyway, I think this may be my favorite LEGO City air terminal yet! It may not be as big as some previous ones, but it feels really coherent. The plane is nice as well with its white, orange, and blue stripes. I agree that Heartlake City Airport's plane has a cozier and more detailed interior, though. It does really highlight some of the differences between Friends and City, with City opting for capacity over comfort and function over flair.
I’m pleased to report that I thoroughly enjoyed building this set, and what’s more I quite enjoyed playing with it afterwards as well…. First and foremost it’s an excellent play set – it’s not often that you get three good-sized vehicles plus a large building and a number of accessories in a single set at this price point. Furthermore, all three aircraft are actually pretty good, particularly the two jets which look really sleek apart from their prominent cockpit canopies. The jets are also solidly built, surprisingly weighty, and eminently swooshable; you can conveniently grab them by their lateral air intakes and nothing falls off when you swoosh them around - I know this as I extensively tested this particular play feature…. The hanger is admittedly a bit insubstantial, but overall this set lived up to my expectations and I’ll certainly be picking up a couple more of the Airport sets this summer.
Play out real-life scenarios in LEGO DUPLO Town: a recognizable world with modern DUPLO figures. Help your little pilot get ready for take-off at the LEGO DUPLO Airport! It's easy for preschoolers to build the boarding gate, luggage slide and revolving air traffic control tower. Makes an ideal gift for preschool children. Contains 29 pieces. Airport measures over 8 (22cm) high, 5 (14cm) wide and 4 (11cm) deep. Plane measures over 3 (9cm) high, 7 (18cm) long and 6 (17cm) wide.
If you’ve watched Captain America: Civil War, you’d know that the airport is the scene of one of the coolest superhero showdowns ever, with Team Iron Man and Team Captain America duking it out on the tarmac. The scene is chaotic, gorgeously choreographed and most importantly stolen by the likes of Spider-Man (not included in this set) and Ant-Man transforming into the aptly named Giant-Man.
So that's it... It's the first passenger airport set released in 6 years.  It comes with a jet, 6 minifigures, a terminal, and some equipment for servicing the aircraft.  Should you get it?  After getting it, I'm glad I got it on sale, but I'm still not sure it was worth what I paid.  I think it needs at least another terminal worker and then a pilot and flight attendant.  Also you're paying for a lot of BURPs to help smooth the aircraft out. The age range listed is 6-12 years old so clearly it is not meant for old farts like me looking for a good building experience.  However, if you're a LEGO CITY fan and you build your own MOCs to go with your city, it has some good additions.  If you're looking to build an airport terminal of your own, you'll find some useful parts to make it realistic.  We'll see if it takes another 6 years for an upgrade.

City is the thematic title under which most Town-related System sets were released from 2005 and onward. There are numerous sets that are associated with Construction, Police, Fire, Emergency, Train, Airport, Transportation, Cargo, Traffic, Coast Guard, Farm, Great Vehicles, Mining, and Space. European catalogs featured another theme called City in the years 1999 to 2000, which was referred to as City Center in American catalogs.


My six year old grandson loves Lego's. His daddy is a pilot so we got him this Lego City Airport for his birthday. Wow! He couldn't wait to put it together! It was organized in bags (which I didn't know) and this prevents overwhelming a little person. At least that's what my son said! He did indeed help our grandson put it together, but that was expected as a father/son project. It is so realistic! I love the tower especially. It has moving parts and all kinds of nifty little things - like luggage! The plane has a bathroom too! This is a great addition to anyone who loves Lego's!
The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]
So that's it... It's the first passenger airport set released in 6 years.  It comes with a jet, 6 minifigures, a terminal, and some equipment for servicing the aircraft.  Should you get it?  After getting it, I'm glad I got it on sale, but I'm still not sure it was worth what I paid.  I think it needs at least another terminal worker and then a pilot and flight attendant.  Also you're paying for a lot of BURPs to help smooth the aircraft out. The age range listed is 6-12 years old so clearly it is not meant for old farts like me looking for a good building experience.  However, if you're a LEGO CITY fan and you build your own MOCs to go with your city, it has some good additions.  If you're looking to build an airport terminal of your own, you'll find some useful parts to make it realistic.  We'll see if it takes another 6 years for an upgrade.
Other airlines offering intercontinental connections to Copenhagen are SAS's Star Alliance partners Singapore Airlines (to Singapore), Air Canada (to Toronto) and Thai Airways (to Bangkok Suvarnabhumi and Phuket), as well as competing SkyTeam carrier Delta with a seasonal connection to JFK and Pakistan International Airlines to Islamabad and Lahore.
The intelligent brick can be programmed using official software available for Windows and Mac computers, and is downloaded onto the brick via Bluetooth or a USB cable. There are also several unofficial programs and compatible programming languages that have been made to work with the brick, and many books have been written to support this community.[52]
Copenhagen is not only the main airport for the densely-populated Øresund region, but also the main air transportation hub for Scandinavia, the main hub for the joint Danish-Swedish-Norwegian carrier SAS Group, and one of Europe's major hubs. There is a large number of intercontinental connections to Copenhagen, as well as a dense network of short-haul connections from Copenhagen to destinations throughout all of Europe, especially the Nordic countries.
Bag 3 starts the aircraft and includes 3 minifigures (2 passengers and a pilot)  The aircraft has the standard wings and fuselage sections.  I am not a fan of the giant wing piece as it limits the number of seats.  It does however help to make the aircraft more realistic.  Given the size of the aircraft, there are only 5 seats for passengers which is rather disappointing.
The body of the plane is built with five seats for passengers. The wings are added next with what I think are filler stickers added to the top of the wings. There is a small galley with sink and oven in the front of the plane right behind the cockpit. The cockpit uses only one sticker to show navigation equipment - the other is printed, which is always welcome (though not a new piece). A lavatory is installed in the back, and then the inside is complete. There is an odd choice for the door to the lav - a swinging door. Not much opportunity for privacy!
This set has essentially all that's needed for airplane-related play: the plane, an airport terminal, and a service vehicle. And each part of the set is quite detailed. The plane feature a galley and a toilet; the service vehicle has stairs, a baggage trailer, etc; and the terminal has revolving doors, security check, and a baggage conveyor belt. The building process is also well planned out and documented. The child is eased into building by starting out with the service vehicle, then comes the plane, and last the terminal, which can be challenging.

Lego has an ongoing deal with publisher Dorling Kindersley (DK), who are producing a series of illustrated hardback books looking at different aspects of the construction toy. The first was "The Ultimate Lego Book", published in 1999. More recently, in 2009, the same publisher produced The LEGO Book, which was sold within a slipcase along with Standing Small: A celebration of 30 years of the LEGO minifigure, a smaller book focused on the minifigure. In 2012, a revised edition was published. Also in 2009, DK also published books on Lego Star Wars and a range of Lego-based sticker books.[90]
The Lego Group's motto is det bedste er ikke for godt which means roughly "only the best is the best" (more literally "the best is never too good").[8] This motto, which is still used today, was created by Christiansen to encourage his employees never to skimp on quality, a value he believed in strongly.[8] By 1951 plastic toys accounted for half of the Lego company's output, even though the Danish trade magazine Legetøjs-Tidende ("Toy-Times"), visiting the Lego factory in Billund in the early 1950s, felt that plastic would never be able to replace traditional wooden toys.[13] Although a common sentiment, Lego toys seem to have become a significant exception to the dislike of plastic in children's toys, due in part to the high standards set by Ole Kirk.[14]
The cockpit, including the stickers on the sides and the canopy, is identical to that of the first jet, as is the front of the aircraft. As previously noted, however, the wing configuration is different, as is the tail design which features twin tail fins and a pair of fuselage-mounted tailplanes. The red 4 x 1 x 3 tail fins, which have appeared in a total of seven sets including this one, are angled outwards similar to the arrangement on an F/A-18 Hornet. Overall, it’s another sleek design but once again the smooth lines are somewhat spoiled by the prominent canopy.
After World City's discontinuation in 2004, it was replaced with City as System's primary town-life related theme in 2005. However, unlike its predecessor, it was not limited to sets involving rescue services like Police, Fire or Coast Guard, but also introduced the first new construction site related sets since the discontinuation of City Center in 2000. In 2006, the first new airport set that included the first jetway since 6597 Century Skyway (1994) was released, as well as the first new hospital since 6380 Emergency Treatment Center from 1987. These releases expanded City to a scope only comparable to the original Town theme, and in 2009 it even went slightly beyond that, by introducing the first farm-related System sets. Also, in that year, City followed this route to release more truly civilian town life sets such as 7641 City Corner and 7639 Camper. In 2010 City released more civilian sets including 8403 Family House and 8404 Public Transport. In 2011 City re-introduced the Space sub-theme along with some new Harbour sets. In the first wave of 2012, City had forest police and fire sets as well as some more commercial/civilian sets. The second wave of 2012 featured the introduction of the Mining theme and respective sets, as well as a hospital. In the winter of 2013, Police and Fire sets were once again focused on but, contrary to those released in the previous year, were set in the city. In the summer of 2013, the Coast Guard and Cargo subthemes were brought back.
Help the pilot and the airport worker get the packages ready for delivery! Use the hand truck to load the packages on the airport service car and drive them to the back of the plane for loading. Fit all the packages in and then make sure the back is closed before letting the pilot know he's good to go. Take off for some fun package delivery in LEGO® City!
Billund Airport (Danish: Billund Lufthavn) (IATA: BLL, ICAO: EKBI) is an airport in Denmark. Located 1 nautical mile (1.9 km; 1.2 mi) northeast[1] of Billund, it serves as one of the country's busiest air cargo centres, as well as a charter airline destination, although some regular airlines also offer flights there. Nearby Legoland Billund park is the largest tourist attraction in Denmark outside Copenhagen.
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