The construction of the new airport was carried out during 1964 and the airport opened on 1 November, with one runway at 1660 meters in length and 45 meters width, a small platform where aircraft could be served, and a control tower to the controller. Hans Erik Christensen, the former chief pilot at LEGO became director, and the passengers were handled in LEGO's hangar until the first terminal building was opened in the spring of 1966. The airport was continuously expanded the following years, with new facilities, terminal buildings, lounge, tax-free area and hangars where LC Johansen's studio often participated as an architect (today called the Johannsen Architects), while other work was carried out by the airport's own studio.
By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group.[13] It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that led to the idea of a toy system. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their locking ability was limited and they were not versatile.[3] In 1958, the modern brick design was developed; it took five years to find the right material for it, ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.[11][12] The modern Lego brick design was patented on 28 January 1958.[15]
Parking capacity at Copenhagen Airport was greatly expanded in 2015 with the construction of a new lot as one of the first phases in an ambitious airport expansion plan scheduled to roll out in the coming decades. There are several lots: those near the terminals are very expensive, while the further-flung ones are cheaper (but have free shuttle bus service to the terminals).
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