On Friday the LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron set was unveiled in Billund, Denmark. This is the latest set to recreate an iconic supercar into a scaled down new Technic set. Thanks to the LEGO Group Community Team, we’ve been very privileged to be able to build this impressive new set. We don’t build that many Technic sets here at BricksFanz, but even if we did, this set is unlike anything else. For this review, we aren’t going to dwell too much on part use, but more the experience of the building the set and our thoughts on the final model. So start those engines and get ready to read our review of the LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron.
The programmable Lego brick which is at the heart of these robotics sets has undergone several updates and redesigns, with the latest being called the 'EV3' brick, being sold under the name of Lego Mindstorms EV3. The set includes sensors that detect touch, light, sound and ultrasonic waves, with several others being sold separately, including an RFID reader.[52]
It makes me sad, but I have to start the review of the building process with a huge portion of criticism. No doubt, such a massive and heavy model requires some extra strong framing, which is why there are so many liftarms and pin connectors. But with more complicated structures every small assembly mistake costs way too much time and pleasure. I consider myself to be an experienced LEGO Technic builder, but somehow I forgot to place a small 8—tooth gear during the very first pages of the guide. It was as late as the bags numbered #11 (of 13) when I discovered that the tower wouldn’t rotate when it should. By that time, more than 3,000 pieces had been used already, covering over the rotating mechanism completely. The worst part of it was how impossible it was to look inside the model and to find the place where the piece was missing. It took me another hour to partially disassemble one side of the crane and to squeeze in the missed gear using small tweezers.
Over the years, several new pieces were introduced in this line as well. The new pump was spring based, and could only be operated by hand, which limited pneumatic power to how fast it could be manually pumped. This obviously limited the power of pneumatic circuits. So in 1992, LEGO introduced two new pieces; a small pump and a small cylinder. The small pump did not have a spring on it, and it was designed to be operated by a motor, which would allow for continuously-running pneumatic creations. As of 2011, the small pump has only appeared in one set — 8868 Air Tech Claw Rig (1992) (found on Peeron) — and a few parts sets (no longer available). A new version of the small pump was released in Lego set 8110 Unimog U400 (2011). At 2L, this pump's stroke is 1/3 longer than the old one's 1.5L, 'L' being the LEGO unit of a stud. This made it much easier to use in studless construction.
I think the BWE 42055 is the set of he year, all themes taken in account, because it’s new, it’s “fresh” and LEGO has tempted to make this type of model and without to be perfect it’s a great model : nice harmony of the colors, the proportions are well respected and to challenge a B-model with a huge amount of parts, nearly 3000, is outstanding, a real success. I would nearly prefer the Mobile aggregate… 🙂
In June 2013, it was reported that Warner Bros. was developing a feature film adaptation of Lego Ninjago. Brothers Dan Hageman and Kevin Hageman were attached to write the adaptation, while Dan Lin and Roy Lee, along with Phil Lord and Chris Miller, were announced as producers.[87] The film, The Lego Ninjago Movie, was released in September 2017.[88] A computer-generated animated series based on Lego Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu began in 2011, and another based on Legends of Chima began in 2013. A television series of Lego City has also been announced.[89]
Although no longer being published in the United States by Scholastic, books covering events in the Bionicle storyline are written by Greg Farshtey. They are still being published in Europe by AMEET. Bionicle comics, also written by Farshtey, are compiled into graphic novels and were released by Papercutz. This series ended in 2009, after nine years.[91]
×