I am a newbie to Lego and wanted a challenge. I did a couple of the small Architecture sets before tackling this. I know nothing about cars. But the directions were good enough that I managed to complete this with only a few missteps and episodes of frustration. The build was very absorbing and satisfying, and I am enjoying displaying the model on my desk at work and showing it to people.
There are 9 different motorised functions that can be activated through 3 switches and one huge gearbox, which sits right behind the boom. You can see one of the switches to the left of the gearbox that allows you to choose between activating mechanisms sitting inside the chassis (the outriggers and the tower rotation) and mechanisms located inside the tower (the boom and the winch functions). Again, stickers provide an ideal solution by displaying onboard instructions, ensuring playability is never lost.
Yes, the only issue is that it is really expensive. While there is cool detail, authentic interior and genuine mirrored instructions, this might be out of the price range for many, but if you have the cash, then don’t hesitate to get your hands on one of the finest sets LEGO has ever released. Or this can make a great Christmas gift for your loved ones.
It’s usually hard to find a reason to criticise the packaging of LEGO sets, but here’s something I was very confused by. Nowadays, plastic bags with pieces come in 2 different designs — one with a white stripe in the middle (new design) and the other is without it (old design). I have nothing against bags of both designs mixed in one box, but you have to be extra careful with bags #6 and #9. While old bags had a distinctive dot after the number 9, bags of the newer design don’t have one. And this is how I got a picture like this:
The Lego Group's motto is det bedste er ikke for godt which means roughly "only the best is the best" (more literally "the best is never too good").[8] This motto, which is still used today, was created by Christiansen to encourage his employees never to skimp on quality, a value he believed in strongly.[8] By 1951 plastic toys accounted for half of the Lego company's output, even though the Danish trade magazine Legetøjs-Tidende ("Toy-Times"), visiting the Lego factory in Billund in the early 1950s, felt that plastic would never be able to replace traditional wooden toys.[13] Although a common sentiment, Lego toys seem to have become a significant exception to the dislike of plastic in children's toys, due in part to the high standards set by Ole Kirk.[14]
The first dedicated Technic motor was a 4.5 volt rounded brick (p/n 6216m) released in 1977 as part of the Expert Builder Power Pack (960-1) and Supplementary Set (870-1), this output via a small protruding axle that would rotate when the motor was powered. The motor was not geared, resulting in high-RPM, low-torque output. Gearboxes and a square casing were available. A 12 volt motor of the same physical dimensions as the 4.5 volt motor was also available in set 880-1. The 12 volt version is visually distinguishable by being black, rather than grey.
Lego also initiated a robotics line of toys called 'Mindstorms' in 1999, and has continued to expand and update this range ever since. The roots of the product originate from a programmable brick developed at the MIT Media Lab, and the name is taken from a paper by Seymour Papert, a computer scientist and educator who developed the educational theory of constructionism, and whose research was at times funded by the Lego Group.[51]
Although I’ve not built many Technic sets, I had a few when I was a kid and in recent years tackled the VOLVO L350F Wheel Loader. Things have changed greatly between the sets I built in the 80s to Bugatti. The new Technic system which was introduced in the early 2000s has lead to a collection of models which continue to innovate and challenge. Would I of have purchased this set, if I didn’t have the opportunity to review it? Probably not but I would be missing out on a genuinely unique LEGO experience. An experience which begins from the moment you lift the lid and feast your eyes upon its perfectly arranged boxes.
Here is the official description of the set: Harness the awesome power of the CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC! Experience the ultimate in farming technology with this 2-in-1 LEGO Technic reproduction of the high-powered CLAAS XERION tractor. This meticulously detailed replica comes with the trademarked green, gray and red color scheme and an array of authentic features and functions. Turn on the included Power Functions motor and you can raise the cab and turn it through 180°, operate the versatile crane or extend the outriggers. The vehicle’s front-wheel, 4-wheel and crab steering provide ultimate maneuverability with the huge tractor tires ensuring optimal grip for immense pulling power on all types of terrain. Rebuild the tractor’s crane to create a CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with Silage Plow! CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with crane arm lowered measures over 11” (30cm) high, 24” (61cm) long and 7” (18cm) wide, and over 14” (37cm) high with crane arm raised. 1977 pieces. Price: $179.99 – BUY HERE
These are called power parts by LEGO Technic, and they help make the models move and increase the interactivity. These are great options for young children as they can play more with the construction toy after it is finished. Check out customer reviews and videos, as often people will comment if they were able to add these kinds of parts in after building and will give instruction booklets on how you can do it too.
Celebrate innovative engineering and design from one of the world's leading car manufacturers with this stunning LEGO Technic car toy model. Developed in partnership with Dr. ING. H.C.F. Porsche AG, this elegantly packaged LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with its sleek aerodynamic lines, adjustable rear spoiler and orange bodywork is packed with authentic features and functions that capture the magic of the iconic supercar, and the attention to detail is clear from the outset! Open the doors and you'll discover an elaborate cockpit with racing seats, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, detailed dashboard and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Lift the rear lid and you'll have access to a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons, while under the hood you'll find a storage area with suitcase. Red suspension springs, detailed brake calipers and original-design rims with special low-profile road-gripping tires add the final touches to this magnificent model!
My Lego Network is a social networking site that involves items, blueprints, ranks, badges which are earned for completing certain tasks, trading and trophies called masterpieces which allow users to progress to go to the next rank. The website has a built in inbox which allows users to send pre written messages to one another. The Lego Network includes automated non-player characters within called "Networkers", who are able to do things which normal users cannot do, sending custom messages, and selling masterpieces and blueprints. The site also has modules which are set up on the user's page that give the user items, or that display picture compositions. Before My Lego Network, there were Lego Club Pages, which essentially held the same purpose, although the design lacked complex interaction.[65]
^ Jump up to: a b Alexander, Ruth (3 December 2012). "How tall can a Lego tower get?". BBC News. Archived from the original on 4 December 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012. The average maximum force the bricks can stand is 4,240N. That's equivalent to a mass of 432 kg (950lbs). If you divide that by the mass of a single brick, which is 1.152g, then you get the grand total of bricks a single piece of Lego could support: 375,000. So, 375,000 bricks towering 3.5 kilometers (2.17 miles) high is what it would take to break a Lego brick.
"This life-size model is a first of its kind in so many ways and with it, we wanted to push the boundaries of our own imagination," said Lena Dixen, senior VP of product and marketing at LEGO. "Our Technic designers and the engineers from the Kladno factory in the Czech Republic, the place which also builds the impressive models for LEGO Stores and LEGOLAND parks, have done an amazing job both at recreating the Chiron’s iconic shapes and making it possible to drive this model."
A decent amount of gears, connectors and axles makes the new crane almost a perfect choice both for beginners, who may still be short on key building elements, and experienced builders who can enjoy building the model and use these piece for another massive creation. However, we can’t recommend getting the new crane for the sake of panels: Because of the tower’s asymmetrical structure, you’ll notice that most of the panels come in uneven amounts.
First - the box. The cardboard is thick, the box has a top and bottom (two parts), and a large vibrant picture of the model. When you open the box, you do not find a sea of plastic bags as with other Lego sets. Instead, you find four numbered boxes, four special edition wheels nestled in their own cutouts in a cardboard insert, and a large manual bearing only the Porsche logo on the cover. The manual itself is nice enough to be a coffee table book.
×