Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were used primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.
Technic has certainly produced a lot of large models this year. Only 5 out of the 12 sets this year are under $50. These three are the best of them all, in my opinion. The accuracy of detail in the Volvo EW160E and the CLAAS XERION, combined with their functions, make them truly great sets. Now, the BWE is indeed the largest Technic set ever by piece (it’s 7th largest overall) and probably size, and it’s my favorite of the three. Its poor performance, however, lets the model down somewhat. I think it needs 2 XL-motors, not one, for power. The Mobile Aggregate Processor works okay, though, and it looks quite cool. Sadly I will have to pass on it, in favor of many other sets this year. 🙁

Experience the iconic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. Inside the box you'll discover a special collector's book chronicling the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars, together with 4 original-design rims bearing the RS emblem. The sets of elements are boxed, and the building sequence gives an insight into the real-life vehicle's assembly process. The model features detailed, orange bodywork, red suspension springs, detailed headlights, taillights, brake calipers and rims with low-profile tires. The accessible cockpit features a detailed dashboard, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, racing seats and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Functions include opening doors and hood with storage compartment and suitcase, and an opening rear lid that houses a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons. This 1:8 scale model has been designed to provide an immersive and rewarding building experience.
Experience the iconic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. Inside the box you'll discover a special collector's book chronicling the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars, together with 4 original-design rims bearing the RS emblem. The sets of elements are boxed, and the building sequence gives an insight into the real-life vehicle's assembly process. The model features detailed, orange bodywork, red suspension springs, detailed headlights, taillights, brake calipers and rims with low-profile tires. The accessible cockpit features a detailed dashboard, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, racing seats and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Functions include opening doors and hood with storage compartment and suitcase, and an opening rear lid that houses a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons. This 1:8 scale model has been designed to provide an immersive and rewarding building experience.
This is also a great lower priced set for introducing younger children to the LEGO Technic range. It comes with 631 pieces and LEGO recommend it for 8-14 year olds, though we reckon it is best for preteens. It is a 2-in-1 kit that can also build a Container Straddle-Carrier. When built the model is 9 inches high, 11 inches long and 3 inches wide. It can be played with by hand and has full steering capabilities.
This 2-in-1 kit can build a rally car and a rally buggy. It has a realistic model engine, steering wheels system, suspension and detailed interiors. It is great for learning about the inside of rally cars and how they work, and can be combined with motors that can be purchased separately to create a moving, working car. LEGO suggest this for the 10-16 age bracket, making it an ideal gift for older kids.

This kit, another great one for younger kids, is very lightweight and easy to carry - encouraging imaginative play with the completed model. It is very budget friendly too and is one of the cheapest LEGO Technic kits on the market. The twin-rotor helicopter measures around 4 inches high, 9 inches long and 7 inches wide when fully built. To play with it, kids simply follow the simple instructions which, according to reviews, will take most young kids a day or two.
The perfect LEGO building kit for both car buffs and Technic collectors, the Mercedes-Benz Arocs provides a detailed and enthralling experience. One of the largest sets available, this 2-in-1 model comes complete with authentic detail, a massive power functions motor and advance pneumatic system that controls the crane arm and grabber, tipper and outriggers.
I love the way you can still see the part of the gear system from within the cars interior. Just like many supercars have their engines uncovered and on view, the Technic version does the same with its complicated gear system. They are visible without being thrust in your face. It’s amazing to see something you built so early on in the build, integrates so perfectly into the final model. Which as mentioned replies so much on those first few elements.
I bought this set on its release day and I couldn’t be happier with it! Excellent write-up, and I couldn’t agree more about wishing that LEGO gave you some directions on how to test all of the gearing on such a complicated gear box before you start fully covering it up! When I got the motor installed and fired it up, nothing would move and I was not looking forward to taking apart so many pieces to find the mistake. Fortunately, I had simply forgotten to engage the upper/lower switch…once I flipped that, everything worked! Talk about a relief!

We spent 25 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Those who enjoy constructing replica vehicles will appreciate this list of Lego Technic Sets. These toys are not your typical building blocks; they require careful attention to detail and lots of time to assemble, which is all part of the fun. Here, you'll find luxury cars, off-road bikes, trucks, and much more to add to your collection of true-to-life models. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best lego technic set on Amazon.
Over the past week we’ve been building the LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS, a masterpiece in top-level building-blocks construction. This set is 2,704 pieces large, and it’s going to take you a few hours to construct, regardless of your skill level. This is the sort of set you put together in your spare moments – or something you spend an entire weekend on. Either way, you’ll find this vehicle ending up filling up your desk at 6” (17cm) high, 22” (57cm) long and 9” (25cm) wide.
At 10 inches high, 32 inches long and 7 inches wide, this is a massive construction ideal for older kids and adults. LEGO suggest it for the 11-16 year old age group. There are 2595 pieces, and it can also be rebuilt into a Mack Garbage Truck once completed. Users report spending over a week building this, so it is a great option to keep the user occupied for hours at a time.
Celebrate innovative engineering and design from one of the world's leading car manufacturers with this stunning LEGO Technic car toy model. Developed in partnership with Dr. ING. H.C.F. Porsche AG, this elegantly packaged LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with its sleek aerodynamic lines, adjustable rear spoiler and orange bodywork is packed with authentic features and functions that capture the magic of the iconic supercar, and the attention to detail is clear from the outset! Open the doors and you'll discover an elaborate cockpit with racing seats, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, detailed dashboard and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Lift the rear lid and you'll have access to a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons, while under the hood you'll find a storage area with suitcase. Red suspension springs, detailed brake calipers and original-design rims with special low-profile road-gripping tires add the final touches to this magnificent model!
You might have spotted a couple of white rubber bands right in front of the battery box placed between two thin yellow liftarms. Their function isn’t as obvious as the other parts of the crane, but they are crucial for the model. These bands do not transmit any rotation, but instead create additional friction for the axles they are banded with. Because of the size of the model and considering a really long boom, some mechanisms may accumulate unwanted stress concentrating in numerous connectors and gears. This stress may result into backing run, especially when the gearbox is switched to neutral. The rubber bands help fight any reverse rotation by keeping the axles in set positions.
As a gigantic LEGO nerd and a gigantic car nerd, the last few years have been pretty great. LEGO's Speed Champions range has brought us brick versions of Le Mans prototypes like the Porsche 919 Hybrid and Audi R18 e-tron quattro, and classics like the Ferrari 250GTO and Ford GT40. (In fact, all of the above might be within arm's reach on my increasingly messy desk). For those willing to spend a little more, the LEGO Technic line has bigger replicas you can build, like the yet-to-be-completed LMP2 car still in its box here in my office. (I may have a LEGO problem.) But none of them compare to LEGO's latest creation: a full-size, drivable Bugatti Chiron.
The Znap line was an obvious reaction to K'Nex, an American construction toy company that was founded in 1993. Like those of K'Nex, Znap pieces were more elaborate than traditional Lego bricks, and could allow for more architectural creations, like bridges. Ultimately, Znap proved to be an inferior competitor and failed to catch on. To make matters worse, Lego even used those highly unprofitable Technic motors in some of the sets.

Well, there is the #45517 Transformer 10V DC that LEGO sells to go with the #8878 Rechargeable Battery, but then you would have to use 8878 instead of a normal battery box, and it is a different size that wouldn’t easily fit in the BWE. However, the problem remains, as I doubt you can both charge and use 8878 at the same time. So, no, I don’t think it’s possible to connect the set to an electrical socket and constantly power it that way. And re-engineering sounds risky… the motor might get destroyed. 😕


It is a very sturdy model that will last for a long time after first construction. Some customers have reported allowing younger children to build this with adult supervision, so it is a great toy for bonding with kids on a project. It can be combined with other kits - including power functions - however, most users recommend keeping this particular set as is.

I love the way you can still see the part of the gear system from within the cars interior. Just like many supercars have their engines uncovered and on view, the Technic version does the same with its complicated gear system. They are visible without being thrust in your face. It’s amazing to see something you built so early on in the build, integrates so perfectly into the final model. Which as mentioned replies so much on those first few elements.
However, studless construction also introduces disadvantages. Studless construction is not immediately intuitive, requiring the builder to think five or six steps ahead. [4] While studded construction follows the classic bottom-to-top building pattern, studless construction requires building inside-to-outside. [5] Studdless constructions are noted to often be more flexible than an equivalent studded construction. This is due to the amount of flex in the clip-based pins which are used to attach studdless parts together, whereas studs provide a more rigid friction fit.

Big, big congratulations to your outstanding Technicopedia!  Your combination of full commitment, technical understanding and innovation/marketing know-how is really rare.  But to find a so precise and at the same time personal and caring description of each model is a real gem.  I think I spend some days now on your site, which boosted my total Lego understanding a lot.

It is designed to be able to crash into obstacles, so the materials used are heavy duty and durable. It measures over 2 inches high, 6 inches long and 3 inches wide to give a decent sized model and only uses 135 pieces making it easy to build. LEGO recommend it for kids from 7-14, though we suggest it is best for kids at the younger end of this range.
As impressive and detailed the inner workings are the outside also has its fair share of detail. Much of it is created by Technic fin plates and sticker decals, such as the dashboard dials, brake discs and Bugatti badge found under that iconic horse shoe front grill. Stickers aren’t most LEGO builders favourite things and it’s a shame that some of the pieces haven’t been printed, certainly in the case of the branding badge at the very least. But this should not distract from the rest of the build. Crafting something in LEGO bricks or Technic pieces, which has such defined curves can never be easy. But then combining that with a small feat of LEGO engineering is nothing short of outstanding.
This is a great product (definitely 5*) good value (at RRP) and can be used to add power functions EASILY to any LEGO set that says you CAN add power functions, those sets usually have instructions on "how to" in the book you got with the set - if they don't then go to LEGO website and search by set number for instructions, which you can download too!
In June 2013, it was reported that Warner Bros. was developing a feature film adaptation of Lego Ninjago. Brothers Dan Hageman and Kevin Hageman were attached to write the adaptation, while Dan Lin and Roy Lee, along with Phil Lord and Chris Miller, were announced as producers.[87] The film, The Lego Ninjago Movie, was released in September 2017.[88] A computer-generated animated series based on Lego Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu began in 2011, and another based on Legends of Chima began in 2013. A television series of Lego City has also been announced.[89]
With a large motor and an advanced pneumatic system, you can operate the crane arm mechanism, grabber arm, extend the outriggers, and raise or lower the tipper body just like you are at a construction site. It also maneuvers easily with its twin axle steering, double differential drive, and independent suspension. Its coloring matches the classic white, gray and black scheme of the real-life Mercedes-Benz Arocs.
With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator, 8295 Telescopic Handler or 7645 MT-61 Crystal Reaper are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
The first dedicated Technic motor was a 4.5 volt rounded brick (p/n 6216m) released in 1977 as part of the Expert Builder Power Pack (960-1) and Supplementary Set (870-1), this output via a small protruding axle that would rotate when the motor was powered. The motor was not geared, resulting in high-RPM, low-torque output. Gearboxes and a square casing were available. A 12 volt motor of the same physical dimensions as the 4.5 volt motor was also available in set 880-1. The 12 volt version is visually distinguishable by being black, rather than grey.
×