In short, this is world-class LEGO design and construction on display. These vehicle models and other designs don’t just look like their real-world counterparts, they work like them too! Weight, balance, suspension, aesthetics—all of these qualities and more are taken into account by some immensely talented brick-wielding superfans. In addition to actual vehicles like sports cars, motorcycles, and construction equipment, Incredible LEGO Technic features fictional vehicles from Batman Begins, Avatar, Warhammer 40,000, and Star Wars, as well as oddities like a working braiding machine and a water strider that floats!

I've just seen your post on lugnet and visited your Technic site - that is quite some achievement, it must have taken a lot of work to prepare all the images, information etc! It was a real nostalgia trip for me seeing these old models, I owned a fair proportion of them at the time, and I still have them, mingled in somewhere in my collection. Seeing them on your site makes me want to dig out the instructions and have a go at building them again.  I'm looking forward to seeing  future additions to your site.
One step later the boom is attached to the tower. Usually mobile crane booms are equipped with rope extending mechanism: a block and tackle pulley system sitting inside the boom that allows fast telescoping. This mechanism can be easily recreated with LEGO pieces, and we’ve seen it in 8421 Mobile Crane back in 2005. Unfortunately, the new mobile crane doesn’t include this feature.
I 1<3 Technicopedia.  I discovered your site last year and since then I'm a regular visitor. It's so cool too see the models from my childhood and to read the detailed descriptions of models I wished to had as a child.  It even inspired me to dig up my old sets, to hunt down missing parts and to finally build them up in full glory again. :)  One can clearly see all the time love you invested in this site, keep it up and have fun with your sets!
There are three versions of the pump. The old Generation one pump, the new Generation two pump (both of these are spring-loaded) and the small pump without a spring (designed for use with motors). The Generation one pump is red, while the Generation two pump is yellow and has a larger contact pad at the top of the pump. Generation three pumps are now available in translucent blue.
Lego (Danish: [ˈleːɡo];[1][2] stylised as LEGO) is a line of plastic construction toys that are manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company's flagship product, Lego, consists of colourful interlocking plastic bricks accompanying an array of gears, figurines called minifigures, and various other parts. Lego pieces can be assembled and connected in many ways to construct objects including vehicles, buildings, and working robots. Anything constructed can then be taken apart again, and the pieces used to make other objects.[3][4]
Beams - Beams are long blocks with rows of round holes. All beams are one stud wide, but they can have varying lengths. They constitute the basic structure of the TECHNIC system. Before 2000, the TECHNIC system used TECHNIC bricks, essentially standard bricks with holes along the sides. Beams are part of "studless construction", which allows TECHNIC models to be more compact. They have rounded edges and no studs.
Lego (Danish: [ˈleːɡo];[1][2] stylised as LEGO) is a line of plastic construction toys that are manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company's flagship product, Lego, consists of colourful interlocking plastic bricks accompanying an array of gears, figurines called minifigures, and various other parts. Lego pieces can be assembled and connected in many ways to construct objects including vehicles, buildings, and working robots. Anything constructed can then be taken apart again, and the pieces used to make other objects.[3][4]
There are several robotics competitions which use the Lego robotics sets. The earliest is Botball, a national U.S. middle- and high-school competition stemming from the MIT 6.270 Lego robotics tournament. Other Lego robotics competitions include Junior FIRST LEGO League (Jr.FLL) for students ages 6–9 and FIRST Lego League (FLL) for students ages 9–16 (age 9–14 in the United States, Canada, and Mexico). Jr.FLL and FLL offer real-world engineering challenges to participants. FLL uses Lego-based robots to complete tasks. Jr.FLL participants build models out of Lego elements. In its 2010 season, there were 16,070 FLL teams in over 55 countries. In its 2010 season, there were 2,147 Jr.FLL teams with 12,882 total student participants in the United States and Canada. The international RoboCup Junior football competition involves extensive use of Lego Mindstorms equipment which is often pushed to its extreme limits.[53]
Over the years, several new pieces were introduced in this line as well. The new pump was spring based, and could only be operated by hand, which limited pneumatic power to how fast it could be manually pumped. This obviously limited the power of pneumatic circuits. So in 1992, LEGO introduced two new pieces; a small pump and a small cylinder. The small pump did not have a spring on it, and it was designed to be operated by a motor, which would allow for continuously-running pneumatic creations. As of 2011, the small pump has only appeared in one set — 8868 Air Tech Claw Rig (1992) (found on Peeron) — and a few parts sets (no longer available). A new version of the small pump was released in Lego set 8110 Unimog U400 (2011). At 2L, this pump's stroke is 1/3 longer than the old one's 1.5L, 'L' being the LEGO unit of a stud. This made it much easier to use in studless construction.
First - the box. The cardboard is thick, the box has a top and bottom (two parts), and a large vibrant picture of the model. When you open the box, you do not find a sea of plastic bags as with other Lego sets. Instead, you find four numbered boxes, four special edition wheels nestled in their own cutouts in a cardboard insert, and a large manual bearing only the Porsche logo on the cover. The manual itself is nice enough to be a coffee table book.
You totally unsealed my memories. I didn't ever know I'm able to remember my long lost legos. But I do, and memories keep flowing like tears.  The year-by-year story is stunning me .... I noticed you're working hard to unfold all models of a given year. Anyone else will just review the masterpieces. Your stoic work outshines any suggestion I'll ever be able to make.

Over the years, Lego has licensed themes from numerous cartoon and film franchises and even some from video games. These include Batman, Indiana Jones, Pirates of the Caribbean, Harry Potter, Star Wars, and Minecraft. Although some of the licensed themes, Lego Star Wars and Lego Indiana Jones, had highly successful sales, Lego has expressed a desire to rely more upon their own characters and classic themes, and less upon licensed themes related to movie releases.[48]
The range of LEGO technic sets available out there is vast, and these kits are a great option for both adults and children to keep them occupied for hours on end. The age range does tend to be a little bit older than regular LEGO kits, and they can be a lot more expensive. Younger kids may want to start out with Playmobil. Star Wars fans may be interested in our review of the top LEGO Star Wars sets!
Designing with Technic panels and liftarms is never an easy task, and usually the result is either a total win or an awful failure. Sometimes stickers can transform the model’s boring look, but as I mentioned above the set of stickers for the crane is purely complimentary. The crane’s entire look is done through a very fine choice of panels completed with a wide range of small details and accessories, like this very cool fire extinguisher attached right behind the cab. There’s also a corresponding sticker right underneath it.
LEGO suggest this kit for 9-16 year olds, however many adult reviewers are also very pleased with the quality of the product. The tracked wheels mean the vehicle can be driven over a number of obstacles and it can travel up to 1.5 mph. Everything is included from the remote to the motor, however, it is necessary to buy both AAA and AA batteries for these to work.
This set is so awesome, so many parts and cool pieces. If you like technics you are going to love this set. I will admit it will most likely not stay together as the excavator. We will probably tear this apart to make other cool technic builds. One caution this has a lot of gears and I mean a lot. When assembling it is very important to make sure the gear box assemblies move freely. If you build with to much friction it will not function properly. Should also note that when picking up the rock pieces they tend to bounce around and fall off the conveyor belts at the transfer points. They fall down into the gearing and stop it from functioning. This usually is not a problem for older kids, but my 5 year old seems to have a problem with bricks falling all over into the lower gearing. It crawls, it swivels left and right, and the Excavator raises and lowers. Took us 5 days to build (2-4 hr each day). It has a cool dump truck that is a fun build as well.
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