A decent amount of gears, connectors and axles makes the new crane almost a perfect choice both for beginners, who may still be short on key building elements, and experienced builders who can enjoy building the model and use these piece for another massive creation. However, we can’t recommend getting the new crane for the sake of panels: Because of the tower’s asymmetrical structure, you’ll notice that most of the panels come in uneven amounts.
This LEGO Technic set is a must have for any sports car fans out there looking for a great collectors’ item. This kit mimics the actual build process of a Bugatti Chiron from the engine to chassis. The parts move just like in a real car - the engine, speed settings, gearbox, wheels and steering all have the ability to move and function like a real car. It is not electronic, so cannot be driven and controlled like the RC models, but it will look great once fully built.
The secondary build is a catamaran. Both builds use realistic detail modeled after racing ships with racing color schemes. It doesn’t have active steering set up, but with some ingenuity, you could help your child add that feature. Even though the ships aren’t built for actual water, they’re both simple enough that older elementary children can make them.
With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator, 8295 Telescopic Handler or 7645 MT-61 Crystal Reaper are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
I just like to thank you for the great job you've done putting all this info on the site. No photo or catalogue description can give me such an idea of complexity and ingenuity of some models. For all of the Technic part of my small collection..... I owe your Technicopedia as it helped me making a decision of what sets to buy.......I can't wait for the year 1996 to be posted on your site because reading your comments is pure pleasure. Thanks a lot and keep this wonderful site updating! 
It would be totally unfair not to mention the brilliant design of the cab’s door. This is a sliding door made with an amazingly simple combination of short liftarms and pin connectors. When opened it slides to the back of the cab revealing the cab’s interior. A door like this is an absolutely unnecessary thing for a heavy motorised monster like this crane, but this is what makes it particularly special for the fans.
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It’s usually hard to find a reason to criticise the packaging of LEGO sets, but here’s something I was very confused by. Nowadays, plastic bags with pieces come in 2 different designs — one with a white stripe in the middle (new design) and the other is without it (old design). I have nothing against bags of both designs mixed in one box, but you have to be extra careful with bags #6 and #9. While old bags had a distinctive dot after the number 9, bags of the newer design don’t have one. And this is how I got a picture like this:
Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were use primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.
Included with the Porsche 911 GT3 is a commemorative booklet detailing the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars. In the interior, builders will be treated to a detailed dashboard, working gearbox and glove compartment to give you the most immersive building experience. Every manly man would like to have a real Porsche, but before getting the real deal, you have to get this model.
The primary advantage of studless construction is the addition of new construction methods that were previously unavailable. Liftarms are exactly 1 unit width high, in contrast to studded beams, which are a non-integer multiple of one unit. It can be awkward to use studded beams in vertical structures because it is necessary to insert plates between the studded beams in order to get the holes to line up. Studless beams allow greater flexibility when building in multiple dimensions, while remaining compatible with "classic" studded beams. Some builders also believe that models constructed with studless beams look nicer than their studded counterparts. [3]
After Lego closed down their publishing subsidiary, they moved on to a partnership with Traveller's Tales, and went on to make games like Lego Star Wars, Lego Indiana Jones, Lego Batman, and many more including the very well-received Lego Marvel Super Heroes game, featuring New York City as the overworld and including Marvel characters from the Avengers, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and more.[74][75] More recently, Lego has created a game based on The Lego Movie, due to its popularity.[76]
Though this piece of art was just released, you may end up having trouble finding it for sale anywhere other than 3rd-party retailers. As we publish this review, the LEGO Store online suggests that the car is “Temporarily out of stock” – which could mean that it’s just not quite up to speed for sales yet, or that it really, truly isn’t available because the lot has sold out.
My Lego Network is a social networking site that involves items, blueprints, ranks, badges which are earned for completing certain tasks, trading and trophies called masterpieces which allow users to progress to go to the next rank. The website has a built in inbox which allows users to send pre written messages to one another. The Lego Network includes automated non-player characters within called "Networkers", who are able to do things which normal users cannot do, sending custom messages, and selling masterpieces and blueprints. The site also has modules which are set up on the user's page that give the user items, or that display picture compositions. Before My Lego Network, there were Lego Club Pages, which essentially held the same purpose, although the design lacked complex interaction.[65]
LEGO even got Le Mans-winning racer and latterly Bugatti test driver Andy Wallace to test the creation at the Ehra Lessien test track in Germany. "When I first saw the LEGO Chiron, I was immediately impressed by the accuracy of the model and the minute attention to detail. In fact, from about 20 metres away it's not obvious that you are looking at a LEGO car," he said. "I can only imagine how much time and effort went into making this model. Driving the LEGO Chiron was a great experience, which I thoroughly enjoyed. All those years ago I could never have imagined that one day I would actually drive a LEGO car!"
This is another 2-in-1 kit and it can build two different Mercedes-Benz construction toy vehicles. A large motor is included to allow some of the moving functions to work. There is also a new pneumatic part included to give a more realistic movement to the construction toy arms. It has 2793 pieces and LEGO recommend it for the 11-15 year old range however we believe it is best for the younger end of this age range.
Experience the iconic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. Inside the box you'll discover a special collector's book chronicling the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars, together with 4 original-design rims bearing the RS emblem. The sets of elements are boxed, and the building sequence gives an insight into the real-life vehicle's assembly process. The model features detailed, orange bodywork, red suspension springs, detailed headlights, taillights, brake calipers and rims with low-profile tires. The accessible cockpit features a detailed dashboard, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, racing seats and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Functions include opening doors and hood with storage compartment and suitcase, and an opening rear lid that houses a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons. This 1:8 scale model has been designed to provide an immersive and rewarding building experience.
Lego also initiated a robotics line of toys called 'Mindstorms' in 1999, and has continued to expand and update this range ever since. The roots of the product originate from a programmable brick developed at the MIT Media Lab, and the name is taken from a paper by Seymour Papert, a computer scientist and educator who developed the educational theory of constructionism, and whose research was at times funded by the Lego Group.[51]
Another brilliant piece of the set is the medium thick string, which first appeared in 42070 6×6 All Terrain Tow Truck in 2017. Judging by the official LEGO piece number, the string that comes with the crane is longer than the one for the tow truck, and seems to be at least 2 meters long. It feels very strong and a little bit stretchy, and seems to be perfect for such a large model.
This is another great set for getting younger kids into LEGO Technic sets. Like the WHACK! kit it has a pull back motor making it easy for kids to use and play with when they have completed the model. It is suggested for ages 7-14 years by LEGO, and again we suggest it is best for the younger end of this range. See more gifts for 7 year old boys. The assembly instructions are simple and easy to understand by even very young children.
In 1989, the LEGO pneumatic line was revamped, and a new cylinder and pump piece were introduced. The old cylinders and pumps were discontinued. The chief difference is that the new cylinder had two input valves now, which allowed both pushing and pulling without needing complex circuits involving the distribution block piece. The Generation 2 cylinders also had metal rods so that they more closely resembled real hydraulic cylinders.
Take to the skies with this solid and durable set that is simple enough for younger builders, but also detailed enough to hold the attention of older builders with ease. A cheaper option than most of the products on this list, the Ultralight Helicopter is ideal for budding Master Builders to whet their appetite before moving onto more complicated builds.
TECHNIC Figures are figures that appeared in TECHNIC sets, especially from the CyberSlam/Competition line. They were first introduced in 1986 in the Arctic Action line, and were produced until 2001. They are much larger and have several more joints than the standard minifigure, including bendable elbow and knee-joints. Each figure comes already assembled and is not meant to come apart, but parts can be popped off by pulling too hard. They can connect to both standard LEGO System bricks and on TECHNIC parts, and TECHNIC pegs can fit in their hands. 27 different kinds of Technic figures were created, [6] some sets included the same figures but with different accessories and stickers.
I was surprised how little LEGO marketed/displayed this set! Up until about a couple weeks before the release, I could hardly find any info about this set other than some really mediocre photos. And on release day, my local LEGO store only had 3 copies and they weren’t even displayed in the store! I know it’s a pricey set, but I figured there would be a lot more interest…maybe everyone isn’t as big of a Technic fan as I am!
The primary advantage of studless construction is the addition of new construction methods that were previously unavailable. Liftarms are exactly 1 unit width high, in contrast to studded beams, which are a non-integer multiple of one unit. It can be awkward to use studded beams in vertical structures because it is necessary to insert plates between the studded beams in order to get the holes to line up. Studless beams allow greater flexibility when building in multiple dimensions, while remaining compatible with "classic" studded beams. Some builders also believe that models constructed with studless beams look nicer than their studded counterparts.[3]
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