The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]
There are 9 different motorised functions that can be activated through 3 switches and one huge gearbox, which sits right behind the boom. You can see one of the switches to the left of the gearbox that allows you to choose between activating mechanisms sitting inside the chassis (the outriggers and the tower rotation) and mechanisms located inside the tower (the boom and the winch functions). Again, stickers provide an ideal solution by displaying onboard instructions, ensuring playability is never lost.
The first generation of LEGO Pneumatics ran from 1984 through 1988. This generation is characterised by single port pneumatic cylinders and the more complex plumbing including a three port distribution block with a pressure and vacuum outlet port. These pressure and vacuum lines ran to a switch to provide pressure for extension or vacuum for retraction of the pneumatic cylinders. These are often falsely compared to single acting hydraulic cylinders that require gravity to retract. The difference is that these units retract on the application of vacuum.[citation needed]
In 1997, LEGO introduced the Air Tank, which acts like a battery, storing compressed air so that even more powerful pneumatic circuits can be created. This piece is very popular with the enthusiast community, but many feel that it was underutilised by LEGO, as it only appeared in 3 model sets and a parts pack. This tank is now only available at the LEGO Education Store, along with a new manometer part.

Although no longer being published in the United States by Scholastic, books covering events in the Bionicle storyline are written by Greg Farshtey. They are still being published in Europe by AMEET. Bionicle comics, also written by Farshtey, are compiled into graphic novels and were released by Papercutz. This series ended in 2009, after nine years.[91]


TECHNIC along with System is one of The LEGO Company's main lines. It is based on creating detailed model machines and mechanical toys with specialized beams and connectors to create details more accurately and smoothly. The theme is primarily designed for ages 9 and up, and was first introduced as the Expert Builder series in 1977, was renamed as "TECHNIC" in 1984 and briefly introduced a new kind of figure, the TECHNIC Figure. Most Technic themes are now discontinued. A new type of constraction figure called Ultrabuild was released in 2013. Modern minifigures have never apeared in a TECHNIC set.
When I bought a couple of second-hand Technic sets last week, this guy –the seller- was telling me about a website I should check when I was back home. That was your site, technicopedia.com.  So I did, and what I came across was and is quite amazing, really.  The pictures, schemes, animations, descriptions, reviews, it’s all excellent!........Once again, you’re doing a fantastic job with the website.
At $299 MSRP, I think this set is really a great deal. Lego made a number of new pieces for this set, including new and exclusive wheels. There are also some printed pieces in the set (and some stickers too). The packing for this set is very unique and impressive. Lego really pulled out all the stops for this set. Get it, take your time to build it and enjoy the build, and then marvel at this amazing set.
This is the best Technic set that Lego produced since legendary 8448. It's perfection starts with unpacking and reading through model design intro followed by very interesting set construction. Looks like creators enchanted it with lots of Porsche magic so you will be endlessly enjoying process from the first brick till every single glimpse on it while standing on your favorite shelf. I hope that they will continue with this product line and waiting for something like MB AMG GT or Audi R8. If you are a Lego enthusiast it's a must have.
The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…
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