The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…
Beautifully designed and deeply satisfying to put together, but... 1) Don't buy this if you've never bought a Technic set before. Do at least one mid-sized set before attempting this one. 2) As many have noted, the gear placement on the sequential shifter is wrong, see the Lego fan sites for the very easy fix. 3) the outer body is beautiful, but it doesn't feel nearly as solid and well engineered as the powertrain. 4) They really should have included some optional clear plastic body panels for the gearboxes and engine bay. Hiding all those beautiful moving parts behind opaque plastic is just tragic.
YUMMY!!!! I love the Technicopedia Web Site! You did a lot of work, for sure.  Please accept my sincere thanks for the work you did on the 8880 page. You rock!  Its been so long since I built that set, I hardly remember some of the construction goodies.  Seeing all these models up close and being able to look at and study the mechanics with out all the clutter (seeing the mechanisms directly) is very insightful. Sometimes, some of the functionality of these sets is not so apparent on the box's model photography.  It's almost like the LEGO web site itself should contain a similar archive, or perhaps promote the functionality of the TECHNIC line of sets in a similar fashion.
W.O.W. This set is so detailed & intricate! The manual (one HUGE book!) is well made & will hold up over many builds & rebuilds. The box is gorgeous, the packaging convenient. There are lots of extra pieces, so no worries about missing something. The gears are smooth & slow, just like the real machine. Beautifully recreated, incredibly accurate, hours of building pleasure.
First - the box. The cardboard is thick, the box has a top and bottom (two parts), and a large vibrant picture of the model. When you open the box, you do not find a sea of plastic bags as with other Lego sets. Instead, you find four numbered boxes, four special edition wheels nestled in their own cutouts in a cardboard insert, and a large manual bearing only the Porsche logo on the cover. The manual itself is nice enough to be a coffee table book.
The Znap line was an obvious reaction to K'Nex, an American construction toy company that was founded in 1993. Like those of K'Nex, Znap pieces were more elaborate than traditional Lego bricks, and could allow for more architectural creations, like bridges. Ultimately, Znap proved to be an inferior competitor and failed to catch on. To make matters worse, Lego even used those highly unprofitable Technic motors in some of the sets.
Experience the iconic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. Inside the box you'll discover a special collector's book chronicling the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars, together with 4 original-design rims bearing the RS emblem. The sets of elements are boxed, and the building sequence gives an insight into the real-life vehicle's assembly process. The model features detailed, orange bodywork, red suspension springs, detailed headlights, taillights, brake calipers and rims with low-profile tires. The accessible cockpit features a detailed dashboard, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, racing seats and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Functions include opening doors and hood with storage compartment and suitcase, and an opening rear lid that houses a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons. This 1:8 scale model has been designed to provide an immersive and rewarding building experience.
Yes, the only issue is that it is really expensive. While there is cool detail, authentic interior and genuine mirrored instructions, this might be out of the price range for many, but if you have the cash, then don’t hesitate to get your hands on one of the finest sets LEGO has ever released. Or this can make a great Christmas gift for your loved ones.

It’s usually hard to find a reason to criticise the packaging of LEGO sets, but here’s something I was very confused by. Nowadays, plastic bags with pieces come in 2 different designs — one with a white stripe in the middle (new design) and the other is without it (old design). I have nothing against bags of both designs mixed in one box, but you have to be extra careful with bags #6 and #9. While old bags had a distinctive dot after the number 9, bags of the newer design don’t have one. And this is how I got a picture like this:

The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…
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