➡ #42055 LEGO TECHNIC BUCKET WHEEL EXCAVATOR: This juggernaut is the most talked about LEGO Technic set since it was revealed at the toy fairs earlier this year. It is the largest LEGO Technic set every released, and it is definitely monstrous! While it doesn’t really replicate any specific real-life mining equipment, I don’t think that’s a problem, and personally I love the look. What is a problem however is that the bucket wheel has trouble picking up stuff except from very specific angles. Also, while I do get that such large equipment doesn’t move around very fast in real life, the LEGO model with only one motor is painfully slow. In the video-review by Sariel you can see it in action. I still think that this model is extremely impressive, and perhaps with a bit of tweaking could be made even better. I also really like the look of the alternate model, which is a clever sorting-machine that can separate 1×1 elements from 2×2 elements, and looks like a mobile processing plant. Instructions can be downloaded from the LEGO Technic website.

Beautifully designed and deeply satisfying to put together, but... 1) Don't buy this if you've never bought a Technic set before. Do at least one mid-sized set before attempting this one. 2) As many have noted, the gear placement on the sequential shifter is wrong, see the Lego fan sites for the very easy fix. 3) the outer body is beautiful, but it doesn't feel nearly as solid and well engineered as the powertrain. 4) They really should have included some optional clear plastic body panels for the gearboxes and engine bay. Hiding all those beautiful moving parts behind opaque plastic is just tragic.

The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]
Actually, I think it would be pretty difficult to add a second XL motor, at least without creating a large bulge on one side of the gearbox. Aesthetics aside, after re-watching Sariel’s video, it looks possible to remove the beam-work on the side of the existing XL motor, and add another one next to it. Then add a few gears to connect the new motor to the existing gear-chain before the white slip-gears (making sure that the gears are not in conflict). That should double the strength of the drivetrain, which should improve the performance of the bucket wheel, so that it doesn’t stop at the slightest touch. It won’t speed up any of the functions (I think the drive speed, though infuriatingly slow, is accurate to real life), but it will increase their strength. It will also eat through the battery box’s power at double the speed, however…. 😕 But does that sound like a plausible solution?
The LEGO company at that stage had no idea how much it cost to manufacture the majority of their bricks, they had no idea how much certain sets made. The most shocking finding was about sets that included the LEGO micro-motor and fiber-optic kits — in both cases it cost LEGO more to source these parts then the whole set was being sold for — everyone of these sets was a massive loss leader and no one actually knew. This was combined with a decision to 'retire' a large number of the LEGO Designers who had created the sets from the late 70's through the 80's and into the 90's and replace them with 30 'innovators' who were the top graduates from the best design colleges around Europe. Unfortunately, though great designers they knew little specifically about toy design and less about LEGO building. The number of parts climbed rapidly from 6000 to over 12,000 causing a nightmare of logistics and storage and a huge amount of infrastructure expansion for no gain in sales. Products like Znap, Primo, Scala and worst; Galidor all came out of this period.
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With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator, 8295 Telescopic Handler or 7645 MT-61 Crystal Reaper are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
For example, the Mercedes-Benz Arocs 3245 does not come with its own motor. The engine with moving pistons is a close replica but does not actually move the vehicle. However, as Lego Customer Service points out, you can add in the LEGO Power Functions IR Receiver 8884 and the LEGO Power Functions IR Remote 8885 to turn it into an RC truck powered by remote control. Many fan sites will list detailed instructions from other fans who have done the same modifications and loved them.
Explore engineering excellence with the LEGO® Technic™ 42083 Bugatti Chiron advanced building set. This exclusive model has been developed in partnership with Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S to capture the essence of the quintessential super sports car, and comes with gleaming aerodynamic bodywork, logoed spoked rims with low-profile tires, and detailed brake discs. The accessible cockpit features a Technic 8-speed gearbox with movable paddle gearshift and a steering wheel bearing the Bugatti emblem. Insert the top speed key and you can switch the active rear wing from handling to top speed position. The rear lid affords a glimpse of the detailed W16 engine with moving pistons, while beneath the hood you’ll discover a unique serial number and a compact storage compartment containing a stylish Bugatti overnight bag. This 1:8 scale model comes with a classic Bugatti duo-tone blue color scheme that reflects the brand’s signature color, and a set of stickers for additional detailing. The set is delivered in luxurious box packaging and includes a color collector’s booklet with comprehensive building instructions.
I just like to thank you for the great job you've done putting all this info on the site. No photo or catalogue description can give me such an idea of complexity and ingenuity of some models. For all of the Technic part of my small collection..... I owe your Technicopedia as it helped me making a decision of what sets to buy.......I can't wait for the year 1996 to be posted on your site because reading your comments is pure pleasure. Thanks a lot and keep this wonderful site updating! 
What LEGO Technic set you choose to buy depends largely on the kind of person you are buying for. The beauty of LEGO Technic kits is that there isn’t really an upper age limit – they can be enjoyed by kids and adults alike. That being said, some of the kits do have a lower age limit and these should be adhered to unless you are looking to buy a Technic LEGO building kit to build together.

The secondary build is a catamaran. Both builds use realistic detail modeled after racing ships with racing color schemes. It doesn’t have active steering set up, but with some ingenuity, you could help your child add that feature. Even though the ships aren’t built for actual water, they’re both simple enough that older elementary children can make them.
Frequently Asked Questions | About Brickset | Privacy and Cookies | Affiliate Marketing Disclosure | Site Map | Contact Us LEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, and the Brick and Knob configurations are trademarks of the LEGO Group of Companies. ©2018 The LEGO Group. Brickset, the Brickset logo and all content not covered by The LEGO Group's copyright is, unless otherwise stated, ©1997-2018 Brickset ltd.
The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]

The primary advantage of studless construction is the addition of new construction methods that were previously unavailable. Liftarms are exactly 1 unit width high, in contrast to studded beams, which are a non-integer multiple of one unit. It can be awkward to use studded beams in vertical structures because it is necessary to insert plates between the studded beams in order to get the holes to line up. Studless beams allow greater flexibility when building in multiple dimensions, while remaining compatible with "classic" studded beams. Some builders also believe that models constructed with studless beams look nicer than their studded counterparts.[3]
This is the best Technic set that Lego produced since legendary 8448. It's perfection starts with unpacking and reading through model design intro followed by very interesting set construction. Looks like creators enchanted it with lots of Porsche magic so you will be endlessly enjoying process from the first brick till every single glimpse on it while standing on your favorite shelf. I hope that they will continue with this product line and waiting for something like MB AMG GT or Audi R8. If you are a Lego enthusiast it's a must have.
Well, there is the #45517 Transformer 10V DC that LEGO sells to go with the #8878 Rechargeable Battery, but then you would have to use 8878 instead of a normal battery box, and it is a different size that wouldn’t easily fit in the BWE. However, the problem remains, as I doubt you can both charge and use 8878 at the same time. So, no, I don’t think it’s possible to connect the set to an electrical socket and constantly power it that way. And re-engineering sounds risky… the motor might get destroyed. 😕
Each step of the building process includes a short list of pieces that are required during this particular step, and my fault was not being attentive enough. On the other hand, I would say that massive sets like this one lack check points that will help you try all the mechanisms as they are being assembled. Being able to find a mistake as early as you made it would save a lot of time, but discovering one small mistake 3,000 pieces later is a little bit heartbreaking.
^ Jump up to: a b Alexander, Ruth (3 December 2012). "How tall can a Lego tower get?". BBC News. Archived from the original on 4 December 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012. The average maximum force the bricks can stand is 4,240N. That's equivalent to a mass of 432 kg (950lbs). If you divide that by the mass of a single brick, which is 1.152g, then you get the grand total of bricks a single piece of Lego could support: 375,000. So, 375,000 bricks towering 3.5 kilometers (2.17 miles) high is what it would take to break a Lego brick.
Each step of the building process includes a short list of pieces that are required during this particular step, and my fault was not being attentive enough. On the other hand, I would say that massive sets like this one lack check points that will help you try all the mechanisms as they are being assembled. Being able to find a mistake as early as you made it would save a lot of time, but discovering one small mistake 3,000 pieces later is a little bit heartbreaking.
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Lego (Danish: [ˈleːɡo];[1][2] stylised as LEGO) is a line of plastic construction toys that are manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company's flagship product, Lego, consists of colourful interlocking plastic bricks accompanying an array of gears, figurines called minifigures, and various other parts. Lego pieces can be assembled and connected in many ways to construct objects including vehicles, buildings, and working robots. Anything constructed can then be taken apart again, and the pieces used to make other objects.[3][4]

This is another 2-in-1 kit and it can build two different Mercedes-Benz construction toy vehicles. A large motor is included to allow some of the moving functions to work. There is also a new pneumatic part included to give a more realistic movement to the construction toy arms. It has 2793 pieces and LEGO recommend it for the 11-15 year old range however we believe it is best for the younger end of this age range.
These Lego building sets are great toys!! I ordered this one next day and it came fast and on time for my son's birthday. My ten year old loves to build these!! If you have a child who likes to build things this is the toy to get. My daughters also love these so great for boys and girls!! It is a smart toy that makes kids use their hands, follow directions and exercise perseverance. It will take him a few days to get this built and definitely worth the effort.
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