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Now- the build. I have built a number of Technic sets including the Enzo (8653), but none come close to this build, especially if you are a car fan. The build itself really mimics the process of building a car. You start with the chassis, then build the transmission, then build the engine and connect to the chassis. The mechanics of this set are amazing, especially the transmission. You then begin building the car frame separately, and eventually "marry" the body to the chassis. Then you add the rest of the body panels, complete the interior instruments and trim, and finally add the wheels. Only a set with this many pieces and this much detail can really capture the feeling of building a miniature version of the car, rather than just building a toy.

The LEGO company at that stage had no idea how much it cost to manufacture the majority of their bricks, they had no idea how much certain sets made. The most shocking finding was about sets that included the LEGO micro-motor and fiber-optic kits — in both cases it cost LEGO more to source these parts then the whole set was being sold for — everyone of these sets was a massive loss leader and no one actually knew. This was combined with a decision to 'retire' a large number of the LEGO Designers who had created the sets from the late 70's through the 80's and into the 90's and replace them with 30 'innovators' who were the top graduates from the best design colleges around Europe. Unfortunately, though great designers they knew little specifically about toy design and less about LEGO building. The number of parts climbed rapidly from 6000 to over 12,000 causing a nightmare of logistics and storage and a huge amount of infrastructure expansion for no gain in sales. Products like Znap, Primo, Scala and worst; Galidor all came out of this period.

Designing with Technic panels and liftarms is never an easy task, and usually the result is either a total win or an awful failure. Sometimes stickers can transform the model’s boring look, but as I mentioned above the set of stickers for the crane is purely complimentary. The crane’s entire look is done through a very fine choice of panels completed with a wide range of small details and accessories, like this very cool fire extinguisher attached right behind the cab. There’s also a corresponding sticker right underneath it.


Included with the Porsche 911 GT3 is a commemorative booklet detailing the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars. In the interior, builders will be treated to a detailed dashboard, working gearbox and glove compartment to give you the most immersive building experience. Every manly man would like to have a real Porsche, but before getting the real deal, you have to get this model.
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In 1989, the LEGO pneumatic line was revamped, and a new cylinder and pump piece were introduced. The old cylinders and pumps were discontinued. The chief difference is that the new cylinder had two input valves now, which allowed both pushing and pulling without needing complex circuits involving the distribution block piece. The Generation 2 cylinders also had metal rods so that they more closely resembled real hydraulic cylinders.
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