The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]
As impressive and detailed the inner workings are the outside also has its fair share of detail. Much of it is created by Technic fin plates and sticker decals, such as the dashboard dials, brake discs and Bugatti badge found under that iconic horse shoe front grill. Stickers aren’t most LEGO builders favourite things and it’s a shame that some of the pieces haven’t been printed, certainly in the case of the branding badge at the very least. But this should not distract from the rest of the build. Crafting something in LEGO bricks or Technic pieces, which has such defined curves can never be easy. But then combining that with a small feat of LEGO engineering is nothing short of outstanding.
LEGO suggest this kit for 9-16 year olds, however many adult reviewers are also very pleased with the quality of the product. The tracked wheels mean the vehicle can be driven over a number of obstacles and it can travel up to 1.5 mph. Everything is included from the remote to the motor, however, it is necessary to buy both AAA and AA batteries for these to work.
Merlin Entertainments operates seven Legoland amusement parks, the original in Billund, Denmark, the second in Windsor, England, the third in Günzburg, Germany, the fourth in Carlsbad, California, the fifth in Winter Haven, Florida, the sixth in Nusajaya, Malaysia[66] and the seventh in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.[67] and the eighth in Shanghai, Peoples of Republic of China.[68] On 13 July 2005, the control of 70% of the Legoland parks was sold for $460 million to the Blackstone Group of New York while the remaining 30% is still held by Lego Group.[69] There are also eight Legoland Discovery Centres, two in Germany, four in the United States, one in Japan and one in the United Kingdom. Two Legoland Discovery Centres opened in 2013: one at the Westchester Ridge Hill shopping complex in Yonkers, NY and one at the Vaughan Mills in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada. Another has opened at the Meadowlands complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey in 2014.[70]
Lego Games launched in 2009, was a series of Lego-themed board games designed by Cephas Howard and Reiner Knizia[77][78] in which the players usually build the playing board out of Lego bricks and then play with Lego-style players. Examples of the games include "Minotaurus", in which players roll dice to move characters within a brick-build labyrinth, "Creationary", in which players must build something which appears on a card, or "Ramses Pyramid", in which players collect gems and climb up a customisable pyramid. Like many board games, the games use dice. In Lego Games, the dice are Lego, with Lego squares with symbols on Lego studs on the dice, surrounded by rubber. The games vary from simple to complex, some are similar to "traditional" board games, while others are completely different.[79]
YUMMY!!!! I love the Technicopedia Web Site! You did a lot of work, for sure.  Please accept my sincere thanks for the work you did on the 8880 page. You rock!  Its been so long since I built that set, I hardly remember some of the construction goodies.  Seeing all these models up close and being able to look at and study the mechanics with out all the clutter (seeing the mechanisms directly) is very insightful. Sometimes, some of the functionality of these sets is not so apparent on the box's model photography.  It's almost like the LEGO web site itself should contain a similar archive, or perhaps promote the functionality of the TECHNIC line of sets in a similar fashion.
Here is the official description of the set: Experience the huge Bucket Wheel Excavator! Enjoy building and operating this massive 2-in-1 Bucket Wheel Excavator, the largest LEGO Technic set to date! This awesome, meticulously detailed reproduction of a real-life mining excavator comes with a cool dark-blue and yellow color scheme and an array of authentic features and functions, including hand-railed walkways, huge tracks and a detailed cab. Switch on the included Power Functions motor and you can activate the conveyor belts, rotate the massive superstructure and maneuver the colossal machine into position. Then activate the boom to lower the gigantic, digging bucket wheel and convey the mined material to the waiting mine truck. When you feel like another building challenge, rebuild it into a Mobile Aggregate Processing Plant. Bucket Wheel Excavator measures over 16” (41cm) high, 28” (72cm) long and 11” (29cm) wide. Mobile Aggregate Processing Plant with boom retracted measures over 8” (21cm) high, 34” (88cm) long and 8” (21cm) wide, and over 12” (33cm) high with boom extended. Mine Truck measures over 3” (10cm) high, 7” (19cm) long and 3” (10cm) wide. 3929 pieces. Price: $279.99 – BUY HERE
P.S. I do now see that I could have bought the Rechargeable power kit 8878($75.04), the required 10vDC charger kit 8887 $21.97, and the 20" extension wire for $9.98 to achieve my goals. A total of $106.99 in addition to the $40 for the original 8293 kit). Still think Lego should have included the 20" extension to make 8293 kit much more functional out of the box. Raising from 1 star to 2.
It makes me sad, but I have to start the review of the building process with a huge portion of criticism. No doubt, such a massive and heavy model requires some extra strong framing, which is why there are so many liftarms and pin connectors. But with more complicated structures every small assembly mistake costs way too much time and pleasure. I consider myself to be an experienced LEGO Technic builder, but somehow I forgot to place a small 8—tooth gear during the very first pages of the guide. It was as late as the bags numbered #11 (of 13) when I discovered that the tower wouldn’t rotate when it should. By that time, more than 3,000 pieces had been used already, covering over the rotating mechanism completely. The worst part of it was how impossible it was to look inside the model and to find the place where the piece was missing. It took me another hour to partially disassemble one side of the crane and to squeeze in the missed gear using small tweezers.

^ Jump up to: a b Alexander, Ruth (3 December 2012). "How tall can a Lego tower get?". BBC News. Archived from the original on 4 December 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012. The average maximum force the bricks can stand is 4,240N. That's equivalent to a mass of 432 kg (950lbs). If you divide that by the mass of a single brick, which is 1.152g, then you get the grand total of bricks a single piece of Lego could support: 375,000. So, 375,000 bricks towering 3.5 kilometers (2.17 miles) high is what it would take to break a Lego brick.
One step later the boom is attached to the tower. Usually mobile crane booms are equipped with rope extending mechanism: a block and tackle pulley system sitting inside the boom that allows fast telescoping. This mechanism can be easily recreated with LEGO pieces, and we’ve seen it in 8421 Mobile Crane back in 2005. Unfortunately, the new mobile crane doesn’t include this feature.

Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were used primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.


This set is so awesome, so many parts and cool pieces. If you like technics you are going to love this set. I will admit it will most likely not stay together as the excavator. We will probably tear this apart to make other cool technic builds. One caution this has a lot of gears and I mean a lot. When assembling it is very important to make sure the gear box assemblies move freely. If you build with to much friction it will not function properly. Should also note that when picking up the rock pieces they tend to bounce around and fall off the conveyor belts at the transfer points. They fall down into the gearing and stop it from functioning. This usually is not a problem for older kids, but my 5 year old seems to have a problem with bricks falling all over into the lower gearing. It crawls, it swivels left and right, and the Excavator raises and lowers. Took us 5 days to build (2-4 hr each day). It has a cool dump truck that is a fun build as well.
With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.[citation needed]. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator and 8295 Telescopic Handler are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
Bought this to add on to the 24-hour race car (42039), to add motor operation to door and hood opening and closings, and especially to add headlights to the front of the car. Adding it onto the car was quite simple, but this quickly led to some disappointment when I found that the headlights didn't work independently of the motor. To have the lights come on, you must switch on the power unit that also controls the motor, and while I could leave the door/hood operation in a neutral gear to not activate, the motor whirring just to have the lights shine is a bit of a letdown as I'd like to have just the lights on for a display in the evening (it's in the man cave, so when friends are over, etc.). But it does really enhance the model watching the doors/hood go up and down, but wish I could operate the lights by themselves. Guess I could disconnect the motor operation to have lights only, and then re-attach when needed.
At 10 inches high, 32 inches long and 7 inches wide, this is a massive construction ideal for older kids and adults. LEGO suggest it for the 11-16 year old age group. There are 2595 pieces, and it can also be rebuilt into a Mack Garbage Truck once completed. Users report spending over a week building this, so it is a great option to keep the user occupied for hours at a time.
Since 1963, Lego pieces have been manufactured from a strong, resilient plastic known as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS).[12][30] As of September 2008, Lego engineers use the NX CAD/CAM/CAE PLM software suite to model the elements. The software allows the parts to be optimised by way of mould flow and stress analysis. Prototype moulds are sometimes built before the design is committed to mass production. The ABS plastic is heated to 232 °C (450 °F) until it reaches a dough-like consistency. It is then injected into the moulds at pressures between 25 and 150 tonnes, and takes approximately 15 seconds to cool. The moulds are permitted a tolerance of up to twenty micrometres, to ensure the bricks remain connected.[33] Human inspectors check the output of the moulds, to eliminate significant variations in colour or thickness. According to the Lego Group, about eighteen bricks out of every million fail to meet the standard required.[37] Lego factories recycle all but about 1 percent of their plastic waste from the manufacturing process. If the plastic cannot be re-used in Lego bricks, it is processed and sold on to industries that can make use of it.[38][39] Lego has a self-imposed 2030 deadline to find a more eco-friendly alternative to the ABS plastic it currently uses in its bricks.[40]
Lego has an ongoing deal with publisher Dorling Kindersley (DK), who are producing a series of illustrated hardback books looking at different aspects of the construction toy. The first was "The Ultimate Lego Book", published in 1999. More recently, in 2009, the same publisher produced The LEGO Book, which was sold within a slipcase along with Standing Small: A celebration of 30 years of the LEGO minifigure, a smaller book focused on the minifigure. In 2012, a revised edition was published. Also in 2009, DK also published books on Lego Star Wars and a range of Lego-based sticker books.[90]
This LEGO Technic set is a must have for any sports car fans out there looking for a great collectors’ item. This kit mimics the actual build process of a Bugatti Chiron from the engine to chassis. The parts move just like in a real car - the engine, speed settings, gearbox, wheels and steering all have the ability to move and function like a real car. It is not electronic, so cannot be driven and controlled like the RC models, but it will look great once fully built.

What fun, and what an impressive interpretation of a beautiful and classic car. Five stars but for two missing but essential pieces that stopped assembly midway through the project. But Amazon sent a replacement with no questions asked in two days. Nevertheless the model is beautiful, a challenge for the average non-Lego person like me, and a real presentation piece as a result. Brilliant engineering and flawless instructions of the highest standard in a 500 page color book. Wow,.

The bittersweet part - this model is so thorough and complete, that it includes paneling on the underside of the car, and panels that eventually conceal the transmission and almost all of the engine. Indeed, once you finish the model, you cannot marvel at the mechanics behind the paneling. So, take your time to build this set and really enjoy the mechanics inside it. That said, you can still get some glimpses of the shifting linkages for the transmission.
Chris Hayden been working at City Book Review since 2012, so that makes him the keeper of knowledge. He manages the office and book reviewers (all 200 of them!), which is no small feat. If you’re looking at the book reviews here, you’re seeing them because he sent the books out for review. Without him, this place would fall apart, because no one else in the office knows how to use the postage machine. Two words: job security.

The primary advantage of studless construction is the addition of new construction methods that were previously unavailable. Liftarms are exactly 1 unit width high, in contrast to studded beams, which are a non-integer multiple of one unit. It can be awkward to use studded beams in vertical structures because it is necessary to insert plates between the studded beams in order to get the holes to line up. Studless beams allow greater flexibility when building in multiple dimensions, while remaining compatible with "classic" studded beams. Some builders also believe that models constructed with studless beams look nicer than their studded counterparts. [3]
One of the most anticipated tests of the crane is its lifting capacity. LEGO Technic cranes have never been among the best top-lifters; the second biggest LEGO Technic crane, 42009 Mobile Crane Mk II could only lift about 500 grams/1.1 lbs of cargo. Surprisingly enough, the new mobile crane is capable of lifting twice as much. We managed to make it lift up to 1.1 kg/2.4 lbs of Pepsi cans before the winch mechanism started to give up. Loading the crane with heavier cargo can result in severe damages to the turntable mechanism, so we won’t recommend pushing it to the limits.
The experience of buying a Bugatti goes beyond merely just paying for a it, then getting the keys. Those who chose to become Bugatti owners are involved in all aspects of the cars construction. This includes additional extras such as a travel bag, made from the same material as the cars interior. Which is even included in the Technic set. This can be found nestled under the bonnet of the car. There’s also a speed key which we’ll go into a little more detail later on. The interior of the car includes two seats split with that famous centre line. The cockpit of the car also connects greatly to the inter working of the rest of the build, with gear stick, 8-speed gearbox with movable paddle gearshift and a steering wheel, which is connected to the wheels.
In addition to standard gears, some kits include a rack, a clutch and even worm gears and differential gears. The original differential had a 28 tooth bevel gear, designed to be meshed with the 14 tooth bevel gears (replaced by the 12 tooth gears) to give 2:1 reduction. They can also be meshed with the newer double bevel gears. It was replaced by a newer design incorporating 16 tooth and 24 tooth gears on opposite sides of the casing. The casing holds three 12 tooth bevel gears inside.
Earlier this year, LEGO Technic released a $349, 3,599-piece scale model of the Chiron, but this latest creation is way more impressive. Made from more than a million pieces, it's the first fully functional, self-propelled life-size LEGO Technic car ever built. In fact, LEGO says it's the first non-glued LEGO Technic model of such complexity ever made.
Since around 2000, the Lego Group has been promoting "Lego Serious Play", a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, in which team members build metaphors of their organizational identities and experiences using Lego bricks. Participants work through imaginary scenarios using visual three-dimensional Lego constructions, imaginatively exploring possibilities in a serious form of play.[73]
It is designed to be able to crash into obstacles, so the materials used are heavy duty and durable. It measures over 2 inches high, 6 inches long and 3 inches wide to give a decent sized model and only uses 135 pieces making it easy to build. LEGO recommend it for kids from 7-14, though we suggest it is best for kids at the younger end of this range.
The range of LEGO technic sets available out there is vast, and these kits are a great option for both adults and children to keep them occupied for hours on end. The age range does tend to be a little bit older than regular LEGO kits, and they can be a lot more expensive. Younger kids may want to start out with Playmobil. Star Wars fans may be interested in our review of the top LEGO Star Wars sets!
The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…
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