Lego Technic system expands on the normal Lego bricks with a whole range of new bricks that offer new function and building styles. The most significant change from normal Lego is that single-stud wide bricks ('beams') have circular holes through their vertical face, positioned in-between the studs. These holes can accommodate pins, which enable two beams to be held securely together side-by-side, or hinged at an angle. The holes also act as bearings for axles, on which gears and wheels can be attached to create complex mechanisms. Stud-less beams (studs are the bumps traditionally associated with Lego parts), referred to as 'liftarms' were first introduced in 1989 and through the 1990s and 2000s and increasing number of liftarm designs have been introduced over time.
From the three sets I like the LEGO Technic Bucket Wheel Excavator the most. It doesn’t just provide two great models, but also plenty of very useful parts to build your own monster machines. And the other two sets are faithful replicas of real-life equipment and are also excellent. I think LEGO Technic fans would be happy with any of them. They are listed under the LEGO Technic section of the Online LEGO Shop.
By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group.[13] It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that led to the idea of a toy system. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their locking ability was limited and they were not versatile.[3] In 1958, the modern brick design was developed; it took five years to find the right material for it, ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.[11][12] The modern Lego brick design was patented on 28 January 1958.[15]
This kit, another great one for younger kids, is very lightweight and easy to carry - encouraging imaginative play with the completed model. It is very budget friendly too and is one of the cheapest LEGO Technic kits on the market. The twin-rotor helicopter measures around 4 inches high, 9 inches long and 7 inches wide when fully built. To play with it, kids simply follow the simple instructions which, according to reviews, will take most young kids a day or two.
In 1989, the LEGO pneumatic line was revamped, and a new cylinder and pump piece were introduced. The old cylinders and pumps were discontinued. The chief difference is that the new cylinder had two input valves now, which allowed both pushing and pulling without needing complex circuits involving the distribution block piece. The Generation 2 cylinders also had metal rods so that they more closely resembled real hydraulic cylinders.
The pneumatic elements are most commonly used to resemble and take the function of hydraulic cylinders in appropriate models, actuating a digging arm or crane, for example. They can, however, also be used to build a pneumatic engine, which converts air pressure into rotary motion using the same principles as a steam engine. However, the cylinders are not optimised for this purpose, and such engines tend to be slow and lack power unless the cylinder inlets are enlarged.
There are three versions of the pump. The old Generation one pump, the new Generation two pump (both of these are spring-loaded) and the small pump without a spring (designed for use with motors). The Generation one pump is red, while the Generation two pump is yellow and has a larger contact pad at the top of the pump. Generation three pumps are now available in translucent blue.

I was surprised how little LEGO marketed/displayed this set! Up until about a couple weeks before the release, I could hardly find any info about this set other than some really mediocre photos. And on release day, my local LEGO store only had 3 copies and they weren’t even displayed in the store! I know it’s a pricey set, but I figured there would be a lot more interest…maybe everyone isn’t as big of a Technic fan as I am!
There is a down side, my boys have broken 2 of these, the teeny gears inside can't withstand some of the things they do, BUT I'd still keep buying them, and have, because they inspire creative building of functional lego creations. totally worth purchasing one every year or two in my opinion. The things my boys do are not gentle, by the way, they have really high hopes for the torque these little engines can put up with. they'd have to be made of metal to withstand the abuse. Hey, lego, make these out of metal!
This is another great set for getting younger kids into LEGO Technic sets. Like the WHACK! kit it has a pull back motor making it easy for kids to use and play with when they have completed the model. It is suggested for ages 7-14 years by LEGO, and again we suggest it is best for the younger end of this range. See more gifts for 7 year old boys. The assembly instructions are simple and easy to understand by even very young children.
Since around 2000, the Lego Group has been promoting "Lego Serious Play", a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, in which team members build metaphors of their organizational identities and experiences using Lego bricks. Participants work through imaginary scenarios using visual three-dimensional Lego constructions, imaginatively exploring possibilities in a serious form of play.[73]
There are plenty of manual functions including four-wheel drive, moving pistons inside a detailed V8, and adjustable mirrors. There’s plenty of detail in the cab and in the accessories (tools, chains, and a fire extinguisher). There are Lego Technic plates included for building and lifting. The red and black color scheme is striking, as is the multicolored pieces that go into building the engine and internal components.
Lego Technic system expands on the normal LEGO bricks with a whole range of new bricks that offer new function and building styles. The most significant change from normal LEGO is that single-stud wide bricks ('beams') have circular holes through their vertical face, positioned in-between the studs. These holes can accommodate pins, which enable two beams to be held securely together side-by-side, or hinged at an angle. The holes also act as bearings for axles, on which gears and wheels can be attached to create complex mechanisms. Stud-less beams ( studs are the bumps traditionally associated with Lego parts), referred to as 'liftarms' were first introduced in 1989 and through the 1990s and 2000s and increasing number of liftarm designs have been introduced over time.
Here is the official description of the set: Harness the awesome power of the CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC! Experience the ultimate in farming technology with this 2-in-1 LEGO Technic reproduction of the high-powered CLAAS XERION tractor. This meticulously detailed replica comes with the trademarked green, gray and red color scheme and an array of authentic features and functions. Turn on the included Power Functions motor and you can raise the cab and turn it through 180°, operate the versatile crane or extend the outriggers. The vehicle’s front-wheel, 4-wheel and crab steering provide ultimate maneuverability with the huge tractor tires ensuring optimal grip for immense pulling power on all types of terrain. Rebuild the tractor’s crane to create a CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with Silage Plow! CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with crane arm lowered measures over 11” (30cm) high, 24” (61cm) long and 7” (18cm) wide, and over 14” (37cm) high with crane arm raised. 1977 pieces. Price: $179.99 – BUY HERE
It is designed to be able to crash into obstacles, so the materials used are heavy duty and durable. It measures over 2 inches high, 6 inches long and 3 inches wide to give a decent sized model and only uses 135 pieces making it easy to build. LEGO recommend it for kids from 7-14, though we suggest it is best for kids at the younger end of this range.

Since around 2000, the Lego Group has been promoting "Lego Serious Play", a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, in which team members build metaphors of their organizational identities and experiences using Lego bricks. Participants work through imaginary scenarios using visual three-dimensional Lego constructions, imaginatively exploring possibilities in a serious form of play.[73]
Congratulations on a most excellent site, I spent about an hour browsing it yesterday and I only went to a quarter of it. If you do complete it, it promises to be one of my favorite site.  My compliments on the Technicopedia website....I especially like the format you've chosen for the site. It's a very nice historic overview to see Technic grow over the years. Also it's very nice to see how models (e.g. the cranes) evolve over the years. It must take you a lot of work to research this and put it into HTML....I will follow to progress on your website.
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Technic sets are often characterised by the presence of special pieces, such as gears, axles, and pins. Other special pieces include beams and plates with holes in them, through which the axles could be installed.[2] Some sets also come with pneumatic pieces or electric motors. In recent years, Technic pieces have begun filtering down into other Lego sets as well, including the BIONICLE sets (which were once sold as part of the Technic line), as well as a great many others.
One of the sets best and most fun features is found on the impressive looking rear. A retractable wing sits flush with the slope of the cars body, but can be placed into the ‘speed’ position by using a 1:1 speed key. This can be slotted into an area within the arch of the rear left-side wheel. Twisting the key raises the wing and then turning it a little more, sets it into its final position. It’s an great little feature, which could easily have just been left as a manual movement. But tying it into the use of the speed key is genius. We said we wouldn’t dwell on part use but I didn’t expect to find a couple of stud-shooter guns in the set, they are used to hold the red tubing which represents the rear light strip.
The next step is probably the best thing about the whole model in terms of engineering and use of LEGO pieces. Those of our readers who enjoy assembling larger LEGO Technic sets will know that turntables form a narrow category of Technic pieces used for machines with rotating towers and booms. Usually turntable pieces are no bigger than 8-9 studs in diameter, and obviously such a small joint won’t be able to support a 1,500-piece-heavy tower for a construction crane. The LEGO Technic design team solved this problem in the most elegant way — they chose to build a massive turntable with a roller-bearing assembly. The whole step #6 of the instruction booklet is devoted to the turntable, which use the new 11 x 11 curved gear racks. In the picture below you can see a side-by-side comparison of two turntables — a very small one in the centre and a giant circle made of curved racks around it.

When I bought a couple of second-hand Technic sets last week, this guy –the seller- was telling me about a website I should check when I was back home. That was your site, technicopedia.com.  So I did, and what I came across was and is quite amazing, really.  The pictures, schemes, animations, descriptions, reviews, it’s all excellent!........Once again, you’re doing a fantastic job with the website.


All LEGO kits are somewhat customizable with other sets available on the market, but you may want to get something with more options if buying for a child. The 2-in-1 sets for kids are great as they allow kids to try building two different models, and usually the parts can also be repurposed into more imaginative projects more easily. You can also get kits which can be customized with electronic parts.

Although I’ve not built many Technic sets, I had a few when I was a kid and in recent years tackled the VOLVO L350F Wheel Loader. Things have changed greatly between the sets I built in the 80s to Bugatti. The new Technic system which was introduced in the early 2000s has lead to a collection of models which continue to innovate and challenge. Would I of have purchased this set, if I didn’t have the opportunity to review it? Probably not but I would be missing out on a genuinely unique LEGO experience. An experience which begins from the moment you lift the lid and feast your eyes upon its perfectly arranged boxes.

Three new LEGO Technic sets were released at the beginning of the month, and they are definitely something to talk about. The enormous #42055 LEGO Technic Bucket Wheel Excavator is the largest LEGO Technic set ever released, the #42054 LEGO Technic CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC is considered one of the best looking LEGO Technic sets in recent history, and the #42053 LEGO Technic Volvo EW160E comes with some really neat functions. So let’s take a look at these very impressive sets in more detail. 🙂

The Znap line was an obvious reaction to K'Nex, an American construction toy company that was founded in 1993. Like those of K'Nex, Znap pieces were more elaborate than traditional Lego bricks, and could allow for more architectural creations, like bridges. Ultimately, Znap proved to be an inferior competitor and failed to catch on. To make matters worse, Lego even used those highly unprofitable Technic motors in some of the sets.
Primary concept and development work takes place at the Billund headquarters, where the company employs approximately 120 designers. The company also has smaller design offices in the UK, Spain, Germany, and Japan which are tasked with developing products aimed specifically at these markets. The average development period for a new product is around twelve months, split into three stages. The first stage is to identify market trends and developments, including contact by the designers directly with the market; some are stationed in toy shops close to holidays, while others interview children. The second stage is the design and development of the product based upon the results of the first stage. As of September 2008 the design teams use 3D modelling software to generate CAD drawings from initial design sketches. The designs are then prototyped using an in-house stereolithography machine. These prototypes are presented to the entire project team for comment and for testing by parents and children during the "validation" process. Designs may then be altered in accordance with the results from the focus groups. Virtual models of completed Lego products are built concurrently with the writing of the user instructions. Completed CAD models are also used in the wider organisation, for marketing and packaging.[33]
During the next step, a couple of decorative elements are placed on top of the base. Even though the model features the V-8 engine built with the (boring) regular pieces, I love how an oil filter is attached right next to it. In general, it’s a very small and insignificant element, but the only other set that included any attachments to the engine was a V-8 from 42050 Drag Racer that came with couple of improvised air filters.
What LEGO Technic set you choose to buy depends largely on the kind of person you are buying for. The beauty of LEGO Technic kits is that there isn’t really an upper age limit – they can be enjoyed by kids and adults alike. That being said, some of the kits do have a lower age limit and these should be adhered to unless you are looking to buy a Technic LEGO building kit to build together.
It makes me sad, but I have to start the review of the building process with a huge portion of criticism. No doubt, such a massive and heavy model requires some extra strong framing, which is why there are so many liftarms and pin connectors. But with more complicated structures every small assembly mistake costs way too much time and pleasure. I consider myself to be an experienced LEGO Technic builder, but somehow I forgot to place a small 8—tooth gear during the very first pages of the guide. It was as late as the bags numbered #11 (of 13) when I discovered that the tower wouldn’t rotate when it should. By that time, more than 3,000 pieces had been used already, covering over the rotating mechanism completely. The worst part of it was how impossible it was to look inside the model and to find the place where the piece was missing. It took me another hour to partially disassemble one side of the crane and to squeeze in the missed gear using small tweezers.
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