There are plenty of manual functions including four-wheel drive, moving pistons inside a detailed V8, and adjustable mirrors. There’s plenty of detail in the cab and in the accessories (tools, chains, and a fire extinguisher). There are Lego Technic plates included for building and lifting. The red and black color scheme is striking, as is the multicolored pieces that go into building the engine and internal components.

I 1<3 Technicopedia.  I discovered your site last year and since then I'm a regular visitor. It's so cool too see the models from my childhood and to read the detailed descriptions of models I wished to had as a child.  It even inspired me to dig up my old sets, to hunt down missing parts and to finally build them up in full glory again. :)  One can clearly see all the time love you invested in this site, keep it up and have fun with your sets!
My son bought this to go with the Lego fairground creator set. He successfully put the motor in the set to power the ride. The plus side is Lego quality. My gripes include the need for six batteries (whoa) and the fact that the battery case is not really Lego friendly - specifically it offers limited options for snapping the case onto a Lego base (I guess it's because it's a technic thing).
The intelligent brick can be programmed using official software available for Windows and Mac computers, and is downloaded onto the brick via Bluetooth or a USB cable. There are also several unofficial programs and compatible programming languages that have been made to work with the brick, and many books have been written to support this community.[52]
Technic Figures are figures that appeared in Technic sets, appearing sporadically but heavily featured in the CyberSlam/Competition line. They were first introduced in 1986 in the Arctic Action line, and were produced until 2001. They are much larger and have several more joints than the standard minifigure, including bendable elbow and knee-joints. Each figure comes already assembled and is not meant to come apart, but parts can be popped off by pulling too hard. They can connect to both standard Lego System bricks and on Technic parts, and Technic pegs can fit in their hands. 27 different kinds of Technic figures were created,[6] some sets included the same figures but with different accessories and stickers.
This challenging set offers motorized (but not RC) features, and provides excellent realism through its tilting cab, extensive cabling and opening claw, making you feel like you are on the construction site yourself without any of the heavy lifting. If you are a passionate child in heart and enjoy games, don’t forget to check our top Air hockey tables for more great items like this.
Another brilliant piece of the set is the medium thick string, which first appeared in 42070 6×6 All Terrain Tow Truck in 2017. Judging by the official LEGO piece number, the string that comes with the crane is longer than the one for the tow truck, and seems to be at least 2 meters long. It feels very strong and a little bit stretchy, and seems to be perfect for such a large model.
However, studless construction also introduces disadvantages. Studless construction is not immediately intuitive, requiring the builder to think five or six steps ahead.[4] While studded construction follows the classic bottom-to-top building pattern, studless construction requires building inside-to-outside.[5] Studless constructions are noted to often be more flexible than an equivalent studded construction. This is due to the amount of flex in the clip-based pins which are used to attach studdless parts together, whereas studs provide a more rigid friction fit.

The first generation of LEGO Pneumatics ran from 1984 through 1988. This generation is characterised by single port pneumatic cylinders and the more complex plumbing including a three port distribution block with a pressure and vacuum outlet port. These pressure and vacuum lines ran to a switch to provide pressure for extension or vacuum for retraction of the pneumatic cylinders. These are often falsely compared to single acting hydraulic cylinders that require gravity to retract. The difference is that these units retract on the application of vacuum.[citation needed]
After Lego closed down their publishing subsidiary, they moved on to a partnership with Traveller's Tales, and went on to make games like Lego Star Wars, Lego Indiana Jones, Lego Batman, and many more including the very well-received Lego Marvel Super Heroes game, featuring New York City as the overworld and including Marvel characters from the Avengers, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and more.[74][75] More recently, Lego has created a game based on The Lego Movie, due to its popularity.[76]
With a large motor and an advanced pneumatic system, you can operate the crane arm mechanism, grabber arm, extend the outriggers, and raise or lower the tipper body just like you are at a construction site. It also maneuvers easily with its twin axle steering, double differential drive, and independent suspension. Its coloring matches the classic white, gray and black scheme of the real-life Mercedes-Benz Arocs.
You might have spotted a couple of white rubber bands right in front of the battery box placed between two thin yellow liftarms. Their function isn’t as obvious as the other parts of the crane, but they are crucial for the model. These bands do not transmit any rotation, but instead create additional friction for the axles they are banded with. Because of the size of the model and considering a really long boom, some mechanisms may accumulate unwanted stress concentrating in numerous connectors and gears. This stress may result into backing run, especially when the gearbox is switched to neutral. The rubber bands help fight any reverse rotation by keeping the axles in set positions.
Early TECHNIC motors used the standard 4.5V system, interchangeable with the Trains theme and consisted of a large brick with a small protruding axle. When the motor is activated, the axle rotates. From 1990 onward, this was changed to the 9V system in line with other LEGO themes. The output rotation has a high RPM, but low torque, so it cannot be used to turn heavy objects without additional gears. Later motors contained a hole into which an axle of any length can be inserted.
4+ Agents Adventurers Alpha Team Aqua Raiders Aquazone Atlantis Avatar: The Last Airbender Baby Batman Belville Bionicle Cars Castle Dino Dino Attack Exo-Force Fabuland Fusion Games Hero Factory The Hobbit Homemaker Indiana Jones Jurassic World Legends of Chima The Lego Movie The Lord of the Rings Mars Mission Mickey Mouse Mixels Monster Fighters Ninja Paradisa Pharaoh's Quest Pirates Pirates of the Caribbean Power Miners Prince of Persia Quatro Racers RoboRiders Rock Raiders Scooby-Doo The Simpsons Slizer/Throwbots Space Spider-Man Speed Racer SpongeBob SquarePants Sports Spybotics Studios Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Time Cruisers Toy Story Ultra Agents Vikings Wild West World Racers Znap

Over the past week we’ve been building the LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS, a masterpiece in top-level building-blocks construction. This set is 2,704 pieces large, and it’s going to take you a few hours to construct, regardless of your skill level. This is the sort of set you put together in your spare moments – or something you spend an entire weekend on. Either way, you’ll find this vehicle ending up filling up your desk at 6” (17cm) high, 22” (57cm) long and 9” (25cm) wide.


The capabilities of the Mindstorms range have now been harnessed for use in Iko Creative Prosthetic System, a prosthetic limbs system designed for children. Designs for these Lego prosthetics allow everything from mechanical diggers to laser-firing spaceships to be screwed on to the end of a child's limb. Iko is the work of the Chicago-based Colombian designer Carlos Arturo Torres, and is a modular system that allows children to customise their own prosthetics with the ease of clicking together plastic bricks. Designed with Lego's Future Lab, the Danish toy company's experimental research department, and Cirec, a Colombian foundation for physical rehabilitation, the modular prosthetic incorporates myoelectric sensors that register the activity of the muscle in the stump and send a signal to control movement in the attachment. A processing unit in the body of the prosthetic contains an engine compatible with Lego Mindstorms, the company's robotics line, which lets the wearer build an extensive range of customised, programmable limbs.[54][55]
I just like to thank you for the great job you've done putting all this info on the site. No photo or catalogue description can give me such an idea of complexity and ingenuity of some models. For all of the Technic part of my small collection..... I owe your Technicopedia as it helped me making a decision of what sets to buy.......I can't wait for the year 1996 to be posted on your site because reading your comments is pure pleasure. Thanks a lot and keep this wonderful site updating! 
Back in 2016 LEGO introduced a new ‘ultimate Technic’ range, with the release of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS. The beast of a set introduced a larger scale build, which recreated the iconic Porsche supercar into a unique new set. That model set the scale and overall feel for the next ultimate Technic set, the Bugatti Chiron. Which includes almost 900 more parts than the Porsche, of which only 5 new elements have been created, including the wheel rims, brake disc connectors and three elements within the gear system. But the experience begins long before you even touch a LEGO element, thanks to the high quality and luxurious packaging. Unlike most LEGO products this set comes in a different style box with a lift-off lid. Once removed you’re not greeted by a mass of bagged elements but instead six nearly arranged boxes and two hefty instructions. The attention to detail that has been poured into, what is often a minor part of a LEGO set, is outstanding.
W.O.W. This set is so detailed & intricate! The manual (one HUGE book!) is well made & will hold up over many builds & rebuilds. The box is gorgeous, the packaging convenient. There are lots of extra pieces, so no worries about missing something. The gears are smooth & slow, just like the real machine. Beautifully recreated, incredibly accurate, hours of building pleasure.

There are plenty of manual functions including four-wheel drive, moving pistons inside a detailed V8, and adjustable mirrors. There’s plenty of detail in the cab and in the accessories (tools, chains, and a fire extinguisher). There are Lego Technic plates included for building and lifting. The red and black color scheme is striking, as is the multicolored pieces that go into building the engine and internal components.
Each set comes with many different beams, axles, and other parts, just like the pieces that go into building an actual vehicle. The great thing about Legos and Lego Technic sets is that you can really let your imagination take hold. Even if some of the technic sets do not come with remote controlled options or functioning motors, there are ways to add them in.

On Friday the LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron set was unveiled in Billund, Denmark. This is the latest set to recreate an iconic supercar into a scaled down new Technic set. Thanks to the LEGO Group Community Team, we’ve been very privileged to be able to build this impressive new set. We don’t build that many Technic sets here at BricksFanz, but even if we did, this set is unlike anything else. For this review, we aren’t going to dwell too much on part use, but more the experience of the building the set and our thoughts on the final model. So start those engines and get ready to read our review of the LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron.
At $299 MSRP, I think this set is really a great deal. Lego made a number of new pieces for this set, including new and exclusive wheels. There are also some printed pieces in the set (and some stickers too). The packing for this set is very unique and impressive. Lego really pulled out all the stops for this set. Get it, take your time to build it and enjoy the build, and then marvel at this amazing set.
The pneumatic elements are most commonly used to resemble and take the function of hydraulic cylinders in appropriate models, actuating a digging arm or crane, for example. They can, however, also be used to build a pneumatic engine, which converts air pressure into rotary motion using the same principles as a steam engine. However, the cylinders are not optimised for this purpose, and such engines tend to be slow and lack power unless the cylinder inlets are enlarged.
During the next step, a couple of decorative elements are placed on top of the base. Even though the model features the V-8 engine built with the (boring) regular pieces, I love how an oil filter is attached right next to it. In general, it’s a very small and insignificant element, but the only other set that included any attachments to the engine was a V-8 from 42050 Drag Racer that came with couple of improvised air filters.
TECHNIC Figures are figures that appeared in TECHNIC sets, especially from the CyberSlam/Competition line. They were first introduced in 1986 in the Arctic Action line, and were produced until 2001. They are much larger and have several more joints than the standard minifigure, including bendable elbow and knee-joints. Each figure comes already assembled and is not meant to come apart, but parts can be popped off by pulling too hard. They can connect to both standard LEGO System bricks and on TECHNIC parts, and TECHNIC pegs can fit in their hands. 27 different kinds of Technic figures were created, [6] some sets included the same figures but with different accessories and stickers.

It’s hard to say if red is the best color for a set like this. No doubt, another yellow crane would have been received by the fan community without enthusiasm, while a white one would look very pale and an orange model would be way too bright. I tend to think that red was a nice choice by the designers, while my favourite spot of red is the red rims with black wheel covers.


There are several robotics competitions which use the Lego robotics sets. The earliest is Botball, a national U.S. middle- and high-school competition stemming from the MIT 6.270 Lego robotics tournament. Other Lego robotics competitions include Junior FIRST LEGO League (Jr.FLL) for students ages 6–9 and FIRST Lego League (FLL) for students ages 9–16 (age 9–14 in the United States, Canada, and Mexico). Jr.FLL and FLL offer real-world engineering challenges to participants. FLL uses Lego-based robots to complete tasks. Jr.FLL participants build models out of Lego elements. In its 2010 season, there were 16,070 FLL teams in over 55 countries. In its 2010 season, there were 2,147 Jr.FLL teams with 12,882 total student participants in the United States and Canada. The international RoboCup Junior football competition involves extensive use of Lego Mindstorms equipment which is often pushed to its extreme limits.[53]
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