Here is the official description of the set: Harness the awesome power of the CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC! Experience the ultimate in farming technology with this 2-in-1 LEGO Technic reproduction of the high-powered CLAAS XERION tractor. This meticulously detailed replica comes with the trademarked green, gray and red color scheme and an array of authentic features and functions. Turn on the included Power Functions motor and you can raise the cab and turn it through 180°, operate the versatile crane or extend the outriggers. The vehicle’s front-wheel, 4-wheel and crab steering provide ultimate maneuverability with the huge tractor tires ensuring optimal grip for immense pulling power on all types of terrain. Rebuild the tractor’s crane to create a CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with Silage Plow! CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC with crane arm lowered measures over 11” (30cm) high, 24” (61cm) long and 7” (18cm) wide, and over 14” (37cm) high with crane arm raised. 1977 pieces. Price: $179.99 – BUY HERE

Lego pieces of all varieties constitute a universal system. Despite variation in the design and the purposes of individual pieces over the years, each piece remains compatible in some way with existing pieces. Lego bricks from 1958 still interlock with those made in the current time, and Lego sets for young children are compatible with those made for teenagers. Six bricks of 2 × 4 studs[28] can be combined in 915,103,765 ways.[29]
By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group.[13] It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that led to the idea of a toy system. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their locking ability was limited and they were not versatile.[3] In 1958, the modern brick design was developed; it took five years to find the right material for it, ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.[11][12] The modern Lego brick design was patented on 28 January 1958.[15]

It makes me sad, but I have to start the review of the building process with a huge portion of criticism. No doubt, such a massive and heavy model requires some extra strong framing, which is why there are so many liftarms and pin connectors. But with more complicated structures every small assembly mistake costs way too much time and pleasure. I consider myself to be an experienced LEGO Technic builder, but somehow I forgot to place a small 8—tooth gear during the very first pages of the guide. It was as late as the bags numbered #11 (of 13) when I discovered that the tower wouldn’t rotate when it should. By that time, more than 3,000 pieces had been used already, covering over the rotating mechanism completely. The worst part of it was how impossible it was to look inside the model and to find the place where the piece was missing. It took me another hour to partially disassemble one side of the crane and to squeeze in the missed gear using small tweezers.
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This challenging set offers motorized (but not RC) features, and provides excellent realism through its tilting cab, extensive cabling and opening claw, making you feel like you are on the construction site yourself without any of the heavy lifting. If you are a passionate child in heart and enjoy games, don’t forget to check our top Air hockey tables for more great items like this.
This is the best Technic set that Lego produced since legendary 8448. It's perfection starts with unpacking and reading through model design intro followed by very interesting set construction. Looks like creators enchanted it with lots of Porsche magic so you will be endlessly enjoying process from the first brick till every single glimpse on it while standing on your favorite shelf. I hope that they will continue with this product line and waiting for something like MB AMG GT or Audi R8. If you are a Lego enthusiast it's a must have.
LEGO even got Le Mans-winning racer and latterly Bugatti test driver Andy Wallace to test the creation at the Ehra Lessien test track in Germany. "When I first saw the LEGO Chiron, I was immediately impressed by the accuracy of the model and the minute attention to detail. In fact, from about 20 metres away it's not obvious that you are looking at a LEGO car," he said. "I can only imagine how much time and effort went into making this model. Driving the LEGO Chiron was a great experience, which I thoroughly enjoyed. All those years ago I could never have imagined that one day I would actually drive a LEGO car!"
With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator, 8295 Telescopic Handler or 7645 MT-61 Crystal Reaper are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
Lego Technic Sets are fundamentally different from classic Lego building sets, but they are based on the same idea; that it is a lot of fun to put things together. The main difference is that the Lego Technic sets really delve deeply into what makes the things around us work, whether it’s a helicopter in flight or a Porsche driving down the street.
Technic sets are often characterised by the presence of special pieces, such as gears, axles, and pins. Other special pieces include beams and plates with holes in them, through which the axles could be installed. [2] Some sets also come with pneumatic pieces or electric motors. In recent years, Technic pieces have begun filtering down into other Lego sets as well, including the BIONICLE sets (which were once sold as part of the Technic line), as well as a great many others.
Tastes differ, and while some fans are madly in love with the designs of the recent supercar sets, others are delighted with motorised functions of the flagship builds. Whichever side you take, it’s hard to argue that any heavy LEGO Technic set is a brilliant source of pieces for future creations. 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator released in 2016 became the biggest LEGO Technic set at the time with 3929 pieces. Now, 2 years later the Crane sets a new record of 4057 pieces. Moreover, today, 4 of the 5 largest LEGO Technic sets are available in stores: 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, 42083 Bugatti Chiron, 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator and 42082 Rough Terrain Crane. Let’s have a look at the numbers and compare these 4 massive sets:
I could of quite easily abandoned the build in those first few bags, but I’m glad I carried on because it has been fun, yes frustrating at time, but definitely fun. The final set looks incredible but the truly amazing thing about the LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron is the level of engineering that flows throughout it. Gears, pistons, speed keys, retractable wings and even an overnight bag, ever aspect of the set has been crafted with the same level of care as the actual Bugatti. We also cannot recommend the LEGO Technic podcast enough, LEGO have found plenty of interesting ways to promote sets, like the Black VIP card with the UCS Falcon but the podcast goes above and beyond that. Just like the set, this will be something that will interest both LEGO fans and car enthusiast alike. The LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron is available now exclusively from LEGO Brand Retail Stores and shop.LEGO.com.
This LEGO Technic set is a must have for any sports car fans out there looking for a great collectors’ item. This kit mimics the actual build process of a Bugatti Chiron from the engine to chassis. The parts move just like in a real car - the engine, speed settings, gearbox, wheels and steering all have the ability to move and function like a real car. It is not electronic, so cannot be driven and controlled like the RC models, but it will look great once fully built.
These Lego building sets are great toys!! I ordered this one next day and it came fast and on time for my son's birthday. My ten year old loves to build these!! If you have a child who likes to build things this is the toy to get. My daughters also love these so great for boys and girls!! It is a smart toy that makes kids use their hands, follow directions and exercise perseverance. It will take him a few days to get this built and definitely worth the effort.
"This life-size model is a first of its kind in so many ways and with it, we wanted to push the boundaries of our own imagination," said Lena Dixen, senior VP of product and marketing at LEGO. "Our Technic designers and the engineers from the Kladno factory in the Czech Republic, the place which also builds the impressive models for LEGO Stores and LEGOLAND parks, have done an amazing job both at recreating the Chiron’s iconic shapes and making it possible to drive this model."
LEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, DUPLO, the DUPLO logo, BIONICLE, the BIONICLE logo, LEGENDS OF CHIMA, the LEGENDS OF CHIMA logo, DIMENSIONS, the DIMENSIONS logo, the FRIENDS logo, the MINIFIGURES logo, MINDSTORMS, the MINDSTORMS EV3 logo, MIXELS, the MIXELS logo, NINJAGO, the NINJAGO logo, NEXO KNIGHTS, and the NEXO KNIGHTS logo are trademarks and/or copyrights of the LEGO Group. ©2018 The LEGO Group. All rights reserved.
In 1997, LEGO introduced the Air Tank, which acts like a battery, storing compressed air so that even more powerful pneumatic circuits can be created. This piece is very popular with the enthusiast community, but many feel that it was underutilised by LEGO, as it only appeared in 3 model sets and a parts pack. This tank is now only available at the LEGO Education Store, along with a new manometer part.
The bittersweet part - this model is so thorough and complete, that it includes paneling on the underside of the car, and panels that eventually conceal the transmission and almost all of the engine. Indeed, once you finish the model, you cannot marvel at the mechanics behind the paneling. So, take your time to build this set and really enjoy the mechanics inside it. That said, you can still get some glimpses of the shifting linkages for the transmission.
Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were use primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.

The Mack Anthem is another authentic build. It has a six cylinder L-motor with a spinning radiator and working pistons. The trailer has extendable outriggers for stability. You control the rear wheel drive through front axle steering. The color scheme isn’t exactly true to life, but the blue is more realistic than some of Technic’s brighter color schemes.

The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…
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