Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were used primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.

Lego Games launched in 2009, was a series of Lego-themed board games designed by Cephas Howard and Reiner Knizia[77][78] in which the players usually build the playing board out of Lego bricks and then play with Lego-style players. Examples of the games include "Minotaurus", in which players roll dice to move characters within a brick-build labyrinth, "Creationary", in which players must build something which appears on a card, or "Ramses Pyramid", in which players collect gems and climb up a customisable pyramid. Like many board games, the games use dice. In Lego Games, the dice are Lego, with Lego squares with symbols on Lego studs on the dice, surrounded by rubber. The games vary from simple to complex, some are similar to "traditional" board games, while others are completely different.[79]
Having a family has brought me back into contact with LEGO Technical and I'm still trying to catch up with the many changes.  This is where your site has become so valuable.  I've spent many hours reading through Technicopedia. It's a masterpiece.  The best LEGO Technic review on the net and a worthy link from Wikipedia. Great attention to the evolution of Technic and the various mechanics employed......Keep up the outstanding work.
The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]
What can be better that an awesome LEGO set? Probably, a bigger, more awesome LEGO set! We’ve seen a lot of outstanding LEGO Technic sets during the last 3-4 years, each of them being bigger and more complicated than any model before. The new 42082 Rough Terrain Crane beats all of them in terms of both size and piece count. And judging by its functions and a very solid choice of pieces it offers, the set easily lands at the top of the list of the most attractive LEGO Technic sets of recent years.

Another brilliant piece of the set is the medium thick string, which first appeared in 42070 6×6 All Terrain Tow Truck in 2017. Judging by the official LEGO piece number, the string that comes with the crane is longer than the one for the tow truck, and seems to be at least 2 meters long. It feels very strong and a little bit stretchy, and seems to be perfect for such a large model.
➡ #42053 LEGO TECHNIC VOLVO EW160E: After the very successful #42030 LEGO Technic Volvo L350F Wheel Loader, it makes sense for LEGO to continue recreating some of the most iconic heavy equipment made by Volvo. The black and yellow color-scheme is very pleasing, and the vehicles look awesome. The #42053 LEGO Technic Volvo EW160E is not motorized, although Power Functions can be added. There are a lot of interesting hand-operated moving features however, that doesn’t really need Power Functions anyway. This includes the expandable boom, working bucket, height-adjustable cab, rotating superstructure, rear-controlled front steering, working front blade, and expendable outriggers. (You can see all the working functions in the video-review by Sariel.) The set is a nice addition to the LEGO Technic Volvo collection.
Lego also initiated a robotics line of toys called 'Mindstorms' in 1999, and has continued to expand and update this range ever since. The roots of the product originate from a programmable brick developed at the MIT Media Lab, and the name is taken from a paper by Seymour Papert, a computer scientist and educator who developed the educational theory of constructionism, and whose research was at times funded by the Lego Group.[51]
The first generation of LEGO Pneumatics ran from 1984 through 1988. This generation is characterised by single port pneumatic cylinders and the more complex plumbing including a three port distribution block with a pressure and vacuum outlet port. These pressure and vacuum lines ran to a switch to provide pressure for extension or vacuum for retraction of the pneumatic cylinders. These are often falsely compared to single acting hydraulic cylinders that require gravity to retract. The difference is that these units retract on the application of vacuum.[citation needed]
That detail has made the Lego Technic Set a popular gift idea for young children. In a world where computer screens have made everything virtual, Lego Technic sets stand out because they encourage the much older skill of tinkering and building things from scratch. Some children as young as 6 or 7 become fascinated with the process, which can often lead them to become teenagers and adults working in the STEM fields.
When I bought a couple of second-hand Technic sets last week, this guy –the seller- was telling me about a website I should check when I was back home. That was your site, technicopedia.com.  So I did, and what I came across was and is quite amazing, really.  The pictures, schemes, animations, descriptions, reviews, it’s all excellent!........Once again, you’re doing a fantastic job with the website.
The secondary build is a catamaran. Both builds use realistic detail modeled after racing ships with racing color schemes. It doesn’t have active steering set up, but with some ingenuity, you could help your child add that feature. Even though the ships aren’t built for actual water, they’re both simple enough that older elementary children can make them.

➡ #42053 LEGO TECHNIC VOLVO EW160E: After the very successful #42030 LEGO Technic Volvo L350F Wheel Loader, it makes sense for LEGO to continue recreating some of the most iconic heavy equipment made by Volvo. The black and yellow color-scheme is very pleasing, and the vehicles look awesome. The #42053 LEGO Technic Volvo EW160E is not motorized, although Power Functions can be added. There are a lot of interesting hand-operated moving features however, that doesn’t really need Power Functions anyway. This includes the expandable boom, working bucket, height-adjustable cab, rotating superstructure, rear-controlled front steering, working front blade, and expendable outriggers. (You can see all the working functions in the video-review by Sariel.) The set is a nice addition to the LEGO Technic Volvo collection.


In 1997, LEGO introduced the Air Tank, which acts like a battery, storing compressed air so that even more powerful pneumatic circuits can be created. This piece is very popular with the enthusiast community, but many feel that it was underutilised by LEGO, as it only appeared in 3 model sets and a parts pack. This tank is now only available at the LEGO Education Store, along with a new manometer part.
Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were use primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.
On Friday the LEGO® Technic Bugatti Chiron set was unveiled in Billund, Denmark. This is the latest set to recreate an iconic supercar into a scaled down new Technic set. Thanks to the LEGO Group Community Team, we’ve been very privileged to be able to build this impressive new set. We don’t build that many Technic sets here at BricksFanz, but even if we did, this set is unlike anything else. For this review, we aren’t going to dwell too much on part use, but more the experience of the building the set and our thoughts on the final model. So start those engines and get ready to read our review of the LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron.
I 1<3 Technicopedia.  I discovered your site last year and since then I'm a regular visitor. It's so cool too see the models from my childhood and to read the detailed descriptions of models I wished to had as a child.  It even inspired me to dig up my old sets, to hunt down missing parts and to finally build them up in full glory again. :)  One can clearly see all the time love you invested in this site, keep it up and have fun with your sets!
Likewise, adults who may have spent their working careers on a research vessel can spend weekends assembling models that closely resemble the ship where they work and gain a new appreciation for how it all comes together. By finding a Technic set that aligns with pre-existing goals, hobbies, and interests, the process of building them will become even more engaging.

LEGO is a much loved toy by both adults and kids and has been a classic gift option for decades. The simple, clickable bricks have endless opportunities for imaginative play and creating impressive models. Building on this, LEGO has released their Technic series which uses a slightly different set of construction items to create incredibly detailed models of real-life trucks, boats, and machines.


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Hi, just wanted to say thank you for your site....I was feeling a little nostalgic, browsing the internet checking Lego Technic sites and came upon yours.  The best Lego site I've ever encountered.  It brought back many many memories of sets I both owned and had wanted in the past.  Thanks for all your hard work, wonderful pictures, videos, and your great comments.  Keep it up!

Howdy I'm Adam, The editor of BricksFanz.com - your go to source for the latest LEGO news, reviews and much, much more. Some of you may know me from other LEGO sites so you'll know I have a good experience of the LEGO community and a deep, passionate commitment to all things LEGO. I specialize in seeking out the latest LEGO news and products, as well as being an expert on all thing LEGO gaming based. So welcome to BricksFanz - Fuelling Your LEGO Lifestyle.
It’s usually hard to find a reason to criticise the packaging of LEGO sets, but here’s something I was very confused by. Nowadays, plastic bags with pieces come in 2 different designs — one with a white stripe in the middle (new design) and the other is without it (old design). I have nothing against bags of both designs mixed in one box, but you have to be extra careful with bags #6 and #9. While old bags had a distinctive dot after the number 9, bags of the newer design don’t have one. And this is how I got a picture like this:
These Lego building sets are great toys!! I ordered this one next day and it came fast and on time for my son's birthday. My ten year old loves to build these!! If you have a child who likes to build things this is the toy to get. My daughters also love these so great for boys and girls!! It is a smart toy that makes kids use their hands, follow directions and exercise perseverance. It will take him a few days to get this built and definitely worth the effort.
One of the most anticipated tests of the crane is its lifting capacity. LEGO Technic cranes have never been among the best top-lifters; the second biggest LEGO Technic crane, 42009 Mobile Crane Mk II could only lift about 500 grams/1.1 lbs of cargo. Surprisingly enough, the new mobile crane is capable of lifting twice as much. We managed to make it lift up to 1.1 kg/2.4 lbs of Pepsi cans before the winch mechanism started to give up. Loading the crane with heavier cargo can result in severe damages to the turntable mechanism, so we won’t recommend pushing it to the limits.
Congratulations on a most excellent site, I spent about an hour browsing it yesterday and I only went to a quarter of it. If you do complete it, it promises to be one of my favorite site.  My compliments on the Technicopedia website....I especially like the format you've chosen for the site. It's a very nice historic overview to see Technic grow over the years. Also it's very nice to see how models (e.g. the cranes) evolve over the years. It must take you a lot of work to research this and put it into HTML....I will follow to progress on your website.
The next step is probably the best thing about the whole model in terms of engineering and use of LEGO pieces. Those of our readers who enjoy assembling larger LEGO Technic sets will know that turntables form a narrow category of Technic pieces used for machines with rotating towers and booms. Usually turntable pieces are no bigger than 8-9 studs in diameter, and obviously such a small joint won’t be able to support a 1,500-piece-heavy tower for a construction crane. The LEGO Technic design team solved this problem in the most elegant way — they chose to build a massive turntable with a roller-bearing assembly. The whole step #6 of the instruction booklet is devoted to the turntable, which use the new 11 x 11 curved gear racks. In the picture below you can see a side-by-side comparison of two turntables — a very small one in the centre and a giant circle made of curved racks around it.

Here is the official description of the set: Operate the powerful Volvo EW160E! Enjoy a rewarding building experience with this awesome 2-in-1 LEGO Technic model. Developed in partnership with Volvo Construction Equipment, this meticulously detailed replica of the Volvo EW160E, with its classic yellow and black color scheme, has all the features of the real-life wheeled excavator. Operate the versatile pneumatic boom and grabbing bucket, rotate the massive superstructure and elevate the cab for optimal visibility. If you need extra stability, extend and secure the outriggers, lower the front blade and lift the entire structure into the air! The authenticity of this model is without bounds, right down to the detailed cab with seat, armrests, sun visor and adjustable mirrors. Upgrade with the #8293 LEGO Power Functions motor set (not supplied) and you have a fully motorized boom and working lights! When you feel like another building challenge, rebuild it into the heavy-duty Volvo L30G compact material handler. Volvo EW160E with boom and outriggers retracted measures over 6” (17cm) high, 9” (25cm) long and 4” (12cm) wide, and over 11” (29cm) high, 18” (47cm) long and 7” (18cm) wide with boom and outriggers extended. Volvo L30G with bucket lowered measures over 6” (17cm) high, 13” (34cm) long and 5” (13cm) wide, and over 10” (26cm) high with bucket raised. 1166 pieces. Price: $119.99 – BUY HERE
What fun, and what an impressive interpretation of a beautiful and classic car. Five stars but for two missing but essential pieces that stopped assembly midway through the project. But Amazon sent a replacement with no questions asked in two days. Nevertheless the model is beautiful, a challenge for the average non-Lego person like me, and a real presentation piece as a result. Brilliant engineering and flawless instructions of the highest standard in a 500 page color book. Wow,.

This LEGO Technic set comes with an RC motor and controller so you can drive the finished product around remotely. It can move forward, backward, left and right and can make full 360 degree turns. It is a 2-in-1 set that can be built into either a regular tracked racer or a remote controlled off road vehicle. At 370 pieces, it may be challenging for younger children but is perfect to keep older kids occupied.
This set is so awesome, so many parts and cool pieces. If you like technics you are going to love this set. I will admit it will most likely not stay together as the excavator. We will probably tear this apart to make other cool technic builds. One caution this has a lot of gears and I mean a lot. When assembling it is very important to make sure the gear box assemblies move freely. If you build with to much friction it will not function properly. Should also note that when picking up the rock pieces they tend to bounce around and fall off the conveyor belts at the transfer points. They fall down into the gearing and stop it from functioning. This usually is not a problem for older kids, but my 5 year old seems to have a problem with bricks falling all over into the lower gearing. It crawls, it swivels left and right, and the Excavator raises and lowers. Took us 5 days to build (2-4 hr each day). It has a cool dump truck that is a fun build as well.
It is a very sturdy model that will last for a long time after first construction. Some customers have reported allowing younger children to build this with adult supervision, so it is a great toy for bonding with kids on a project. It can be combined with other kits - including power functions - however, most users recommend keeping this particular set as is.
This is another great set for getting younger kids into LEGO Technic sets. Like the WHACK! kit it has a pull back motor making it easy for kids to use and play with when they have completed the model. It is suggested for ages 7-14 years by LEGO, and again we suggest it is best for the younger end of this range. See more gifts for 7 year old boys. The assembly instructions are simple and easy to understand by even very young children.
Since around 2000, the Lego Group has been promoting "Lego Serious Play", a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, in which team members build metaphors of their organizational identities and experiences using Lego bricks. Participants work through imaginary scenarios using visual three-dimensional Lego constructions, imaginatively exploring possibilities in a serious form of play.[73]
Each set comes with many different beams, axles, and other parts, just like the pieces that go into building an actual vehicle. The great thing about Legos and Lego Technic sets is that you can really let your imagination take hold. Even if some of the technic sets do not come with remote controlled options or functioning motors, there are ways to add them in.
The Lego Group's motto is det bedste er ikke for godt which means roughly "only the best is the best" (more literally "the best is never too good").[8] This motto, which is still used today, was created by Christiansen to encourage his employees never to skimp on quality, a value he believed in strongly.[8] By 1951 plastic toys accounted for half of the Lego company's output, even though the Danish trade magazine Legetøjs-Tidende ("Toy-Times"), visiting the Lego factory in Billund in the early 1950s, felt that plastic would never be able to replace traditional wooden toys.[13] Although a common sentiment, Lego toys seem to have become a significant exception to the dislike of plastic in children's toys, due in part to the high standards set by Ole Kirk.[14]
In 1989, the LEGO pneumatic line was revamped, and a new cylinder and pump piece were introduced. The old cylinders and pumps were discontinued. The chief difference is that the new cylinder had two input valves now, which allowed both pushing and pulling without needing complex circuits involving the distribution block piece. The Generation 2 cylinders also had metal rods so that they more closely resembled real hydraulic cylinders.

➡ #42054 LEGO TECHNIC CLAAS XERION 5000 TRAC VC: What really stands out with this vehicle is the color-scheme; the lime-green, red, and white combination really pops and makes this an impressive display-piece. But there is more. The model is also motorized the raise and turn the cab and to operate the crane, and there are a number of hand-operated features as well. Unfortunately the model can’t pick up any heavier weight (not even a banana), as you can see in the video-review below, and the alternate model is just a rebuild of the attachment, but it is still a very cool looking set.
The Lego Movie, a feature film based on Lego toys, was released by Warner Bros. in February 2014.[81] It featured Chris Pratt in the lead role, with substantial supporting characters voiced by Will Arnett, Morgan Freeman, Liam Neeson, Alison Brie, Will Ferrell and Nick Offerman.[82] A contest was held for contestants to submit designs for vehicles to be used in the film.[83] After the release of The Lego Movie, independent Canadian toy retailers reported issues with shortages of Lego products and cited cancellations of Lego pre-orders without warning[84] as a motive to stock compatible, rival products.[85]
This kit, another great one for younger kids, is very lightweight and easy to carry - encouraging imaginative play with the completed model. It is very budget friendly too and is one of the cheapest LEGO Technic kits on the market. The twin-rotor helicopter measures around 4 inches high, 9 inches long and 7 inches wide when fully built. To play with it, kids simply follow the simple instructions which, according to reviews, will take most young kids a day or two.
LEGO Technic sets pride themselves on offering builds that’s not only challenge those constructing them but also by providing a truly technical feat. This start of the build is certainly the most involved as you engineer the guts of the Bugatti. Here you’ll find a mind-bogging mix of gears, pistons and pins. One of the most important pieces of advice we can give when building this set or any in-depth Technic set for that matter is to always test any sections which feature gears. If you’ve put something on incorrectly or in the wrong hole, you’ll run into problems further along in the build. The engine included in the Bugatti, features two crankshafts, which power a series of 16 pistons. These will run as the wheels turn and can easily be rendered inactive if a pole or peg is too tightly fitted or place ever so slightly wrong.
Experience the iconic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with this authentic LEGO Technic replica. Inside the box you'll discover a special collector's book chronicling the history of LEGO Technic and Porsche GT cars, together with 4 original-design rims bearing the RS emblem. The sets of elements are boxed, and the building sequence gives an insight into the real-life vehicle's assembly process. The model features detailed, orange bodywork, red suspension springs, detailed headlights, taillights, brake calipers and rims with low-profile tires. The accessible cockpit features a detailed dashboard, working gearbox, steering wheel with gearshift paddles, racing seats and a glove compartment containing a unique serial number. Functions include opening doors and hood with storage compartment and suitcase, and an opening rear lid that houses a detailed flat 6 engine with moving pistons. This 1:8 scale model has been designed to provide an immersive and rewarding building experience.
This LEGO Technic set is a must have for any sports car fans out there looking for a great collectors’ item. This kit mimics the actual build process of a Bugatti Chiron from the engine to chassis. The parts move just like in a real car - the engine, speed settings, gearbox, wheels and steering all have the ability to move and function like a real car. It is not electronic, so cannot be driven and controlled like the RC models, but it will look great once fully built.
I was surprised how little LEGO marketed/displayed this set! Up until about a couple weeks before the release, I could hardly find any info about this set other than some really mediocre photos. And on release day, my local LEGO store only had 3 copies and they weren’t even displayed in the store! I know it’s a pricey set, but I figured there would be a lot more interest…maybe everyone isn’t as big of a Technic fan as I am!
The secondary build is a catamaran. Both builds use realistic detail modeled after racing ships with racing color schemes. It doesn’t have active steering set up, but with some ingenuity, you could help your child add that feature. Even though the ships aren’t built for actual water, they’re both simple enough that older elementary children can make them.

What LEGO Technic set you choose to buy depends largely on the kind of person you are buying for. The beauty of LEGO Technic kits is that there isn’t really an upper age limit – they can be enjoyed by kids and adults alike. That being said, some of the kits do have a lower age limit and these should be adhered to unless you are looking to buy a Technic LEGO building kit to build together.
WARNING!!!...the following post sounds like I am gushing (which frankly I am), ....Oh wow Eric...you don't even realize it but it is all YOUR fault. About a year ago when I discovered bricklink and started collecting I stumbled across Technicopedia.  Hours and hours later I realized that I had quite a bit more collecting to do to "catch-up"..... If it were not for your influence I would have never known so many unique technic creations had been produced.... Anyway, I blamed you then and I will blame you again now....you did this....and I couldn't be more thrilled. 

Over the years, Lego has licensed themes from numerous cartoon and film franchises and even some from video games. These include Batman, Indiana Jones, Pirates of the Caribbean, Harry Potter, Star Wars, and Minecraft. Although some of the licensed themes, Lego Star Wars and Lego Indiana Jones, had highly successful sales, Lego has expressed a desire to rely more upon their own characters and classic themes, and less upon licensed themes related to movie releases.[48]
Designing with Technic panels and liftarms is never an easy task, and usually the result is either a total win or an awful failure. Sometimes stickers can transform the model’s boring look, but as I mentioned above the set of stickers for the crane is purely complimentary. The crane’s entire look is done through a very fine choice of panels completed with a wide range of small details and accessories, like this very cool fire extinguisher attached right behind the cab. There’s also a corresponding sticker right underneath it.
LEGO is a much loved toy by both adults and kids and has been a classic gift option for decades. The simple, clickable bricks have endless opportunities for imaginative play and creating impressive models. Building on this, LEGO has released their Technic series which uses a slightly different set of construction items to create incredibly detailed models of real-life trucks, boats, and machines. 
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