This kit, another great one for younger kids, is very lightweight and easy to carry - encouraging imaginative play with the completed model. It is very budget friendly too and is one of the cheapest LEGO Technic kits on the market. The twin-rotor helicopter measures around 4 inches high, 9 inches long and 7 inches wide when fully built. To play with it, kids simply follow the simple instructions which, according to reviews, will take most young kids a day or two.
This is a great product (definitely 5*) good value (at RRP) and can be used to add power functions EASILY to any LEGO set that says you CAN add power functions, those sets usually have instructions on "how to" in the book you got with the set - if they don't then go to LEGO website and search by set number for instructions, which you can download too!
Since around 2000, the Lego Group has been promoting "Lego Serious Play", a form of business consultancy fostering creative thinking, in which team members build metaphors of their organizational identities and experiences using Lego bricks. Participants work through imaginary scenarios using visual three-dimensional Lego constructions, imaginatively exploring possibilities in a serious form of play.[73]
This is also a great lower priced set for introducing younger children to the LEGO Technic range. It comes with 631 pieces and LEGO recommend it for 8-14 year olds, though we reckon it is best for preteens. It is a 2-in-1 kit that can also build a Container Straddle-Carrier. When built the model is 9 inches high, 11 inches long and 3 inches wide. It can be played with by hand and has full steering capabilities.
Among its best features would be its motorized functions, including a working winch and the contra-rotating rotors. The motor also allows it to light up and open the cargo bay doors. However, while the motor can make the rotors spin, it does not get enough speed to actually take flight, which makes it a safe choice for parents of children who love flying toys.
This kit, another great one for younger kids, is very lightweight and easy to carry - encouraging imaginative play with the completed model. It is very budget friendly too and is one of the cheapest LEGO Technic kits on the market. The twin-rotor helicopter measures around 4 inches high, 9 inches long and 7 inches wide when fully built. To play with it, kids simply follow the simple instructions which, according to reviews, will take most young kids a day or two.
The LEGO company at that stage had no idea how much it cost to manufacture the majority of their bricks, they had no idea how much certain sets made. The most shocking finding was about sets that included the LEGO micro-motor and fiber-optic kits — in both cases it cost LEGO more to source these parts then the whole set was being sold for — everyone of these sets was a massive loss leader and no one actually knew. This was combined with a decision to 'retire' a large number of the LEGO Designers who had created the sets from the late 70's through the 80's and into the 90's and replace them with 30 'innovators' who were the top graduates from the best design colleges around Europe. Unfortunately, though great designers they knew little specifically about toy design and less about LEGO building. The number of parts climbed rapidly from 6000 to over 12,000 causing a nightmare of logistics and storage and a huge amount of infrastructure expansion for no gain in sales. Products like Znap, Primo, Scala and worst; Galidor all came out of this period.
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Merlin Entertainments operates seven Legoland amusement parks, the original in Billund, Denmark, the second in Windsor, England, the third in Günzburg, Germany, the fourth in Carlsbad, California, the fifth in Winter Haven, Florida, the sixth in Nusajaya, Malaysia[66] and the seventh in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.[67] and the eighth in Shanghai, Peoples of Republic of China.[68] On 13 July 2005, the control of 70% of the Legoland parks was sold for $460 million to the Blackstone Group of New York while the remaining 30% is still held by Lego Group.[69] There are also eight Legoland Discovery Centres, two in Germany, four in the United States, one in Japan and one in the United Kingdom. Two Legoland Discovery Centres opened in 2013: one at the Westchester Ridge Hill shopping complex in Yonkers, NY and one at the Vaughan Mills in Vaughan, Ontario, Canada. Another has opened at the Meadowlands complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey in 2014.[70]

Though this piece of art was just released, you may end up having trouble finding it for sale anywhere other than 3rd-party retailers. As we publish this review, the LEGO Store online suggests that the car is “Temporarily out of stock” – which could mean that it’s just not quite up to speed for sales yet, or that it really, truly isn’t available because the lot has sold out.

I've just seen your post on lugnet and visited your Technic site - that is quite some achievement, it must have taken a lot of work to prepare all the images, information etc! It was a real nostalgia trip for me seeing these old models, I owned a fair proportion of them at the time, and I still have them, mingled in somewhere in my collection. Seeing them on your site makes me want to dig out the instructions and have a go at building them again.  I'm looking forward to seeing  future additions to your site.
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Stafford considers the Galidor line to be Lego's most heinous offense. Based on a kid's show of the same name, the line was basically an action figure series with awkward features like interchangeable arms for characters. Each set in the line featured specialized pieces, which were expensive to produce and in practically no way resembled a Lego product.
Now- the build. I have built a number of Technic sets including the Enzo (8653), but none come close to this build, especially if you are a car fan. The build itself really mimics the process of building a car. You start with the chassis, then build the transmission, then build the engine and connect to the chassis. The mechanics of this set are amazing, especially the transmission. You then begin building the car frame separately, and eventually "marry" the body to the chassis. Then you add the rest of the body panels, complete the interior instruments and trim, and finally add the wheels. Only a set with this many pieces and this much detail can really capture the feeling of building a miniature version of the car, rather than just building a toy.
The alternative build is a futuristic flying bike complete with its own stand. It’s wildly different than many of Technic’s vehicles, so if you’re looking for something unique to display, this is the B-model for you. It includes a rotating and angling rear thruster and folding wings. It seems like the luggage pieces for A-model are there just to make the stand for the B-model, but we aren’t complaining.
The definitive shape of the Lego bricks, with the inner tubes, was patented by the Lego Group in 1958.[15][56] Several competitors have attempted to take advantage of Lego's popularity by producing blocks of similar dimensions, and advertising them as being compatible with Lego bricks. In 2002, Lego sued the CoCo Toy Company in Beijing for copyright infringement over its "Coko bricks" product. CoCo was ordered to cease manufacture of the products, publish a formal apology and pay damages.[57] Lego sued the English company Best-Lock Construction Toys in German courts in 2004[58] and 2009;[59] the Federal Patent Court of Germany denied Lego trademark protection for the shape of its bricks for the latter case.[60] In 2005, the Lego Company sued Canadian company Mega Bloks for trademark violation, but the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Mega Bloks' rights to sell their product.[61] In 2010, the European Court of Justice ruled that the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick "merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark."[62]

I just wanted to tell you that I love your LEGO Technic site.  I unearthed my old Technic models a while ago.......At that time I thought to myself: "There has to be some kind of LEGO Technic fansite on the net", I needed more information about the things I missed during those 10 years. I started searching, and imagined what the perfect source would look like, and well then I found it in the form of your Technicopedia. Its not only the highly detailed descriptions, but I love it when somebody combines great insight with a casual, personal style of presentation.


This is also a great lower priced set for introducing younger children to the LEGO Technic range. It comes with 631 pieces and LEGO recommend it for 8-14 year olds, though we reckon it is best for preteens. It is a 2-in-1 kit that can also build a Container Straddle-Carrier. When built the model is 9 inches high, 11 inches long and 3 inches wide. It can be played with by hand and has full steering capabilities.
I am a newbie to Lego and wanted a challenge. I did a couple of the small Architecture sets before tackling this. I know nothing about cars. But the directions were good enough that I managed to complete this with only a few missteps and episodes of frustration. The build was very absorbing and satisfying, and I am enjoying displaying the model on my desk at work and showing it to people.
I bought this set on its release day and I couldn’t be happier with it! Excellent write-up, and I couldn’t agree more about wishing that LEGO gave you some directions on how to test all of the gearing on such a complicated gear box before you start fully covering it up! When I got the motor installed and fired it up, nothing would move and I was not looking forward to taking apart so many pieces to find the mistake. Fortunately, I had simply forgotten to engage the upper/lower switch…once I flipped that, everything worked! Talk about a relief!
First of all, let me just say that Technicopedia is simply amazing. I’m currently recovering from an almost 20 year long "dark age", and your website has been both a source of nostalgia when it comes to the old ‘90s sets I had when I was a kid, as well as a great infodump re. the progress Technic made since then and up to date.  Please keep up the great work!
The next step is probably the best thing about the whole model in terms of engineering and use of LEGO pieces. Those of our readers who enjoy assembling larger LEGO Technic sets will know that turntables form a narrow category of Technic pieces used for machines with rotating towers and booms. Usually turntable pieces are no bigger than 8-9 studs in diameter, and obviously such a small joint won’t be able to support a 1,500-piece-heavy tower for a construction crane. The LEGO Technic design team solved this problem in the most elegant way — they chose to build a massive turntable with a roller-bearing assembly. The whole step #6 of the instruction booklet is devoted to the turntable, which use the new 11 x 11 curved gear racks. In the picture below you can see a side-by-side comparison of two turntables — a very small one in the centre and a giant circle made of curved racks around it.

Technic sets are often characterised by the presence of special pieces, such as gears, axles, and pins. Other special pieces include beams and plates with holes in them, through which the axles could be installed.[2] Some sets also come with pneumatic pieces or electric motors. In recent years, Technic pieces have begun filtering down into other Lego sets as well, including the BIONICLE sets (which were once sold as part of the Technic line), as well as a great many others.
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