This is another great set for getting younger kids into LEGO Technic sets. Like the WHACK! kit it has a pull back motor making it easy for kids to use and play with when they have completed the model. It is suggested for ages 7-14 years by LEGO, and again we suggest it is best for the younger end of this range. See more gifts for 7 year old boys. The assembly instructions are simple and easy to understand by even very young children.

Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were used primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.

Actually, I love the purpose of stickers in this set. They do not influence the shape of the crane, but rather fill empty spaces and emphasise things that need your attention. For instance, a whole bunch of pinch point labels are placed by the exposed gears on top of the tower. Hiding gears inside the body would cost space and panels, and stickers help to solve this problem in a very elegant way.
As impressive and detailed the inner workings are the outside also has its fair share of detail. Much of it is created by Technic fin plates and sticker decals, such as the dashboard dials, brake discs and Bugatti badge found under that iconic horse shoe front grill. Stickers aren’t most LEGO builders favourite things and it’s a shame that some of the pieces haven’t been printed, certainly in the case of the branding badge at the very least. But this should not distract from the rest of the build. Crafting something in LEGO bricks or Technic pieces, which has such defined curves can never be easy. But then combining that with a small feat of LEGO engineering is nothing short of outstanding.
4. The motor mount is similarly limited. I can use rivets to mount the front of the motor to a girder, which seems most promising. The bottom lugs however are not strong enough for much, and the motor popped off easily while running. There are no top lugs, so in essence there is one mounting option which then forces model to be designed around the motor.
These are called power parts by LEGO Technic, and they help make the models move and increase the interactivity. These are great options for young children as they can play more with the construction toy after it is finished. Check out customer reviews and videos, as often people will comment if they were able to add these kinds of parts in after building and will give instruction booklets on how you can do it too.
Congratulations on a most excellent site, I spent about an hour browsing it yesterday and I only went to a quarter of it. If you do complete it, it promises to be one of my favorite site.  My compliments on the Technicopedia website....I especially like the format you've chosen for the site. It's a very nice historic overview to see Technic grow over the years. Also it's very nice to see how models (e.g. the cranes) evolve over the years. It must take you a lot of work to research this and put it into HTML....I will follow to progress on your website.

Howdy I'm Adam, The editor of BricksFanz.com - your go to source for the latest LEGO news, reviews and much, much more. Some of you may know me from other LEGO sites so you'll know I have a good experience of the LEGO community and a deep, passionate commitment to all things LEGO. I specialize in seeking out the latest LEGO news and products, as well as being an expert on all thing LEGO gaming based. So welcome to BricksFanz - Fuelling Your LEGO Lifestyle.

Although I’ve not built many Technic sets, I had a few when I was a kid and in recent years tackled the VOLVO L350F Wheel Loader. Things have changed greatly between the sets I built in the 80s to Bugatti. The new Technic system which was introduced in the early 2000s has lead to a collection of models which continue to innovate and challenge. Would I of have purchased this set, if I didn’t have the opportunity to review it? Probably not but I would be missing out on a genuinely unique LEGO experience. An experience which begins from the moment you lift the lid and feast your eyes upon its perfectly arranged boxes.
Tastes differ, and while some fans are madly in love with the designs of the recent supercar sets, others are delighted with motorised functions of the flagship builds. Whichever side you take, it’s hard to argue that any heavy LEGO Technic set is a brilliant source of pieces for future creations. 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator released in 2016 became the biggest LEGO Technic set at the time with 3929 pieces. Now, 2 years later the Crane sets a new record of 4057 pieces. Moreover, today, 4 of the 5 largest LEGO Technic sets are available in stores: 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, 42083 Bugatti Chiron, 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator and 42082 Rough Terrain Crane. Let’s have a look at the numbers and compare these 4 massive sets:
That detail has made the Lego Technic Set a popular gift idea for young children. In a world where computer screens have made everything virtual, Lego Technic sets stand out because they encourage the much older skill of tinkering and building things from scratch. Some children as young as 6 or 7 become fascinated with the process, which can often lead them to become teenagers and adults working in the STEM fields.
With these sets it is possible to build or convert manually-operated mechanical movement to motorized using electric motors which are controlled via switches or IR remote control. Future plans for this set include more parts which will add even more function/control possibilities.. Lego has already started to design and sell Lego Technic models (sets) which can be easily retrofitted with the Power Functions system. For example, models like the 8294 Excavator, 8295 Telescopic Handler or 7645 MT-61 Crystal Reaper are sold like classic Lego Technic models with manual motorization but are designed with free space for the Power Functions components with factory instructions on how to perform the conversion to an electrically operated model.
The next step is probably the best thing about the whole model in terms of engineering and use of LEGO pieces. Those of our readers who enjoy assembling larger LEGO Technic sets will know that turntables form a narrow category of Technic pieces used for machines with rotating towers and booms. Usually turntable pieces are no bigger than 8-9 studs in diameter, and obviously such a small joint won’t be able to support a 1,500-piece-heavy tower for a construction crane. The LEGO Technic design team solved this problem in the most elegant way — they chose to build a massive turntable with a roller-bearing assembly. The whole step #6 of the instruction booklet is devoted to the turntable, which use the new 11 x 11 curved gear racks. In the picture below you can see a side-by-side comparison of two turntables — a very small one in the centre and a giant circle made of curved racks around it.

During the next step, a couple of decorative elements are placed on top of the base. Even though the model features the V-8 engine built with the (boring) regular pieces, I love how an oil filter is attached right next to it. In general, it’s a very small and insignificant element, but the only other set that included any attachments to the engine was a V-8 from 42050 Drag Racer that came with couple of improvised air filters.


SmartBrick is carried by Vengit Ltd. LEGO®, the LEGO® logo, the Minifigure®, DUPLO®, the DUPLO® logo, BIONICLE®, the BIONICLE® logo, LEGENDS OF CHIMA®, the LEGENDS OF CHIMA® logo, DIMENSIONS®, the DIMENSIONS® logo, the FRIENDS® logo, the MINIFIGURES® logo, MINDSTORMS®, the MINDSTORMS EV3® logo, MIXELS®, the MIXELS® logo, NINJAGO®, the NINJAGO® logo, NEXO KNIGHTS®, and the NEXO KNIGHTS® logo are trademarks and/or copyrights of the LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this web site. ©2018 The LEGO Group. All rights reserved.
Power functions are the cutting edge of the Technics, fueled by our love of RC vehicles. They use motors, two infrared receivers, a remote control and a battery box to make a Lego Technic set to come to life. Some, like the RC racer, are already set up for the technology and others can be converted using special steps. Lego is currently making more models which can be retrofitted with the Power Functions package.
Just to give you a little background on my Lego experience, prior to purchasing this set, I had built the Batman Tumbler (discontinued) and the Star Wars X-Wing (discontinued). I found the Tumbler to be moderately difficult as it was my first Lego set and it took a little time for me to understand the Lego blueprints. The Star Wars X-Wing was very easy in comparison. When I received the Porsche 911, I decided that I was going to take my time and enjoy building the set instead of making a mad dash to finish it quickly. The experience was quite enjoyable and I recommend anyone who is considering this item to definitely get it! You will not be disappointed! I'd like to point out for all you considering this purchase to read up on the gear issues prior to assembling the Lego. If you don't, you'll find that the gears do not work, which is not a big issue if you're going to keep it as an display item. I currently own 4 Lego sets, my fourth one being the newest Millennium Falcon and the Porsche 911 is by far my most favorite!
My son bought this to go with the Lego fairground creator set. He successfully put the motor in the set to power the ride. The plus side is Lego quality. My gripes include the need for six batteries (whoa) and the fact that the battery case is not really Lego friendly - specifically it offers limited options for snapping the case onto a Lego base (I guess it's because it's a technic thing).
“On the basis of this feedback we designed the next model and simultaneously started with the development of the wheels rims which are an important part of the legendary design of the car. Afterwards we visited the Porsche Development Center in Weissach as well as the Porsche GT workshop area. During intensive working phases we worked out the elements and details of the car and perfected them.”
First - the box. The cardboard is thick, the box has a top and bottom (two parts), and a large vibrant picture of the model. When you open the box, you do not find a sea of plastic bags as with other Lego sets. Instead, you find four numbered boxes, four special edition wheels nestled in their own cutouts in a cardboard insert, and a large manual bearing only the Porsche logo on the cover. The manual itself is nice enough to be a coffee table book.
Tastes differ, and while some fans are madly in love with the designs of the recent supercar sets, others are delighted with motorised functions of the flagship builds. Whichever side you take, it’s hard to argue that any heavy LEGO Technic set is a brilliant source of pieces for future creations. 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator released in 2016 became the biggest LEGO Technic set at the time with 3929 pieces. Now, 2 years later the Crane sets a new record of 4057 pieces. Moreover, today, 4 of the 5 largest LEGO Technic sets are available in stores: 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, 42083 Bugatti Chiron, 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator and 42082 Rough Terrain Crane. Let’s have a look at the numbers and compare these 4 massive sets:
Let me take the time and say to you Blakbird, that I truly love your site. First of all it give me a quick access to looking at different sets through the years, including descriptions of functions.  But the part with most value for me, is the description of the new parts for each year. As a part designer this is really interesting, learning the history of the Technic pieces, and I don't even know if I could quickly find something similar as an employee. That is why I also eagerly awaits the future beyond 1994. But serious stuff like this takes time, so don't rush it please.

There are 9 different motorised functions that can be activated through 3 switches and one huge gearbox, which sits right behind the boom. You can see one of the switches to the left of the gearbox that allows you to choose between activating mechanisms sitting inside the chassis (the outriggers and the tower rotation) and mechanisms located inside the tower (the boom and the winch functions). Again, stickers provide an ideal solution by displaying onboard instructions, ensuring playability is never lost.


YUMMY!!!! I love the Technicopedia Web Site! You did a lot of work, for sure.  Please accept my sincere thanks for the work you did on the 8880 page. You rock!  Its been so long since I built that set, I hardly remember some of the construction goodies.  Seeing all these models up close and being able to look at and study the mechanics with out all the clutter (seeing the mechanisms directly) is very insightful. Sometimes, some of the functionality of these sets is not so apparent on the box's model photography.  It's almost like the LEGO web site itself should contain a similar archive, or perhaps promote the functionality of the TECHNIC line of sets in a similar fashion.

I don't usually do this, but thought your site deserves a great deal of praise, so here it goes.  After roughly ten years of dark ages, I've been hunting for LEGO Technic sets online for some three years now, but only recently was told about your wonderful site. I just hope someday my Technic collection will be somewhat comparable to yours!....Thank you very much for all the time and effort you're putting into Technicopedia, and it's my hope that small messages such as this one give you enough motivation to carry on.
The capabilities of the Mindstorms range have now been harnessed for use in Iko Creative Prosthetic System, a prosthetic limbs system designed for children. Designs for these Lego prosthetics allow everything from mechanical diggers to laser-firing spaceships to be screwed on to the end of a child's limb. Iko is the work of the Chicago-based Colombian designer Carlos Arturo Torres, and is a modular system that allows children to customise their own prosthetics with the ease of clicking together plastic bricks. Designed with Lego's Future Lab, the Danish toy company's experimental research department, and Cirec, a Colombian foundation for physical rehabilitation, the modular prosthetic incorporates myoelectric sensors that register the activity of the muscle in the stump and send a signal to control movement in the attachment. A processing unit in the body of the prosthetic contains an engine compatible with Lego Mindstorms, the company's robotics line, which lets the wearer build an extensive range of customised, programmable limbs.[54][55]
Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were use primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.
Although liftarms (studless beams) have been present in Technic sets since 1989, the change from primarily studded to primarily studless construction around the year 2000 represented a major paradigm shift and has been quite controversial. Initially liftarms were used primary as styling parts, or to create smaller sub-assemblies which attached to a studded chassis. With an increasing number of liftarm designs introduced, a tipping point was reached around the year 2000 with models introduced primarily constructed from liftarms instead of traditional beams.
×