Let me take the time and say to you Blakbird, that I truly love your site. First of all it give me a quick access to looking at different sets through the years, including descriptions of functions.  But the part with most value for me, is the description of the new parts for each year. As a part designer this is really interesting, learning the history of the Technic pieces, and I don't even know if I could quickly find something similar as an employee. That is why I also eagerly awaits the future beyond 1994. But serious stuff like this takes time, so don't rush it please.
It makes me sad, but I have to start the review of the building process with a huge portion of criticism. No doubt, such a massive and heavy model requires some extra strong framing, which is why there are so many liftarms and pin connectors. But with more complicated structures every small assembly mistake costs way too much time and pleasure. I consider myself to be an experienced LEGO Technic builder, but somehow I forgot to place a small 8—tooth gear during the very first pages of the guide. It was as late as the bags numbered #11 (of 13) when I discovered that the tower wouldn’t rotate when it should. By that time, more than 3,000 pieces had been used already, covering over the rotating mechanism completely. The worst part of it was how impossible it was to look inside the model and to find the place where the piece was missing. It took me another hour to partially disassemble one side of the crane and to squeeze in the missed gear using small tweezers.
“On the basis of this feedback we designed the next model and simultaneously started with the development of the wheels rims which are an important part of the legendary design of the car. Afterwards we visited the Porsche Development Center in Weissach as well as the Porsche GT workshop area. During intensive working phases we worked out the elements and details of the car and perfected them.”
Lego also initiated a robotics line of toys called 'Mindstorms' in 1999, and has continued to expand and update this range ever since. The roots of the product originate from a programmable brick developed at the MIT Media Lab, and the name is taken from a paper by Seymour Papert, a computer scientist and educator who developed the educational theory of constructionism, and whose research was at times funded by the Lego Group.[51]
I could of quite easily abandoned the build in those first few bags, but I’m glad I carried on because it has been fun, yes frustrating at time, but definitely fun. The final set looks incredible but the truly amazing thing about the LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron is the level of engineering that flows throughout it. Gears, pistons, speed keys, retractable wings and even an overnight bag, ever aspect of the set has been crafted with the same level of care as the actual Bugatti. We also cannot recommend the LEGO Technic podcast enough, LEGO have found plenty of interesting ways to promote sets, like the Black VIP card with the UCS Falcon but the podcast goes above and beyond that. Just like the set, this will be something that will interest both LEGO fans and car enthusiast alike. The LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron is available now exclusively from LEGO Brand Retail Stores and shop.LEGO.com.
The primary advantage of studless construction is the addition of new construction methods that were previously unavailable. Liftarms are exactly 1 unit width high, in contrast to studded beams, which are a non-integer multiple of one unit. It can be awkward to use studded beams in vertical structures because it is necessary to insert plates between the studded beams in order to get the holes to line up. Studless beams allow greater flexibility when building in multiple dimensions, while remaining compatible with "classic" studded beams. Some builders also believe that models constructed with studless beams look nicer than their studded counterparts.[3]
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