Frequently Asked Questions | About Brickset | Privacy and Cookies | Affiliate Marketing Disclosure | Site Map | Contact Us LEGO, the LEGO logo, the Minifigure, and the Brick and Knob configurations are trademarks of the LEGO Group of Companies. ©2018 The LEGO Group. Brickset, the Brickset logo and all content not covered by The LEGO Group's copyright is, unless otherwise stated, ©1997-2018 Brickset ltd.
Honestly I have asked many of my friends and only a number even know about LEGO’s removal tool piece, and this is already an updated one from their previous grey piece. Friends, family, strangers – this is a lifesaver. It wouldn’t save you from stepping on a LEGO piece but it helps a tonne in getting pieces off of each other without damaging your nails. Or teeth. Don’t ask.

@DrDave : My thoughts were not that the hangar should be big enough to hold *all* aircraft simultaneously - which would, indeed, make it huge! - but that it should at least be big enough to hold any one of them. Just a few studs wider should cover the wingspan of either jet (judging from the photos). Add a few centimetres to the height - by whatever construction means - and that'll accommodate the oversized tail on the Viggen-styled plane. If/when I pick up this set, that's the mods I'll be making to it.
This is a good set if you want an airport. The set includes a big plain and a terminal. The terminal has a control tower, check-in, luggage handler, fuel tank, ... I expanded my terminal and built it on a 32x32 baseplate and used the 2 grey 16x16 plates for the roof. The backside is not completely closed. Otherwise is the luggage belt is not accessible with my hand. I added 2 extra seats in the plane. Normally you have 6 seats in the plane, but I raised it to 8. I wanted more than 8 but that is almost not possible. The plane is brought with a big brick which includes the middle of the plane and the 2 wings and that one limits the possibilities. The toilet in the plane is still on the backside.
As is the norm with LEGO sets these days, there are a fair few stickers in use for this item. I’m still not a fan of their use, but at this point in time, it is something I have come to expect and just get on with it now. In their defence, they do add to the overall presentation, making it that little bit harder to complain. As I said, this is my favourite of the three planes in the set, mainly because it looks superb and offers a great build experience. Seriously, I had so much fun building this. The instructions – as always – are clear, and it is not going to provide any major issues. Stability-wise, there are no concerns here, with the finished product very sturdy and, as proved by my daughter, can handle itself when being flown around the room by an excited seven-year-old. One minifigure can be seated at the controls, with suitable space for application and removal. The other pilot has its place on the top of the plane, with a single piece of black fencing to provide support for the death-defying pilot.

By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group.[13] It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that led to the idea of a toy system. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their locking ability was limited and they were not versatile.[3] In 1958, the modern brick design was developed; it took five years to find the right material for it, ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.[11][12] The modern Lego brick design was patented on 28 January 1958.[15]


Over the years, Lego has licensed themes from numerous cartoon and film franchises and even some from video games. These include Batman, Indiana Jones, Pirates of the Caribbean, Harry Potter, Star Wars, and Minecraft. Although some of the licensed themes, Lego Star Wars and Lego Indiana Jones, had highly successful sales, Lego has expressed a desire to rely more upon their own characters and classic themes, and less upon licensed themes related to movie releases.[48]
Billund Airport (Danish: Billund Lufthavn) (IATA: BLL, ICAO: EKBI) is an airport in Denmark. Located 1 nautical mile (1.9 km; 1.2 mi) northeast[1] of Billund, it serves as one of the country's busiest air cargo centres, as well as a charter airline destination, although some regular airlines also offer flights there. Nearby Legoland Billund park is the largest tourist attraction in Denmark outside Copenhagen.

By 1954, Christiansen's son, Godtfred, had become the junior managing director of the Lego Group.[13] It was his conversation with an overseas buyer that led to the idea of a toy system. Godtfred saw the immense potential in Lego bricks to become a system for creative play, but the bricks still had some problems from a technical standpoint: their locking ability was limited and they were not versatile.[3] In 1958, the modern brick design was developed; it took five years to find the right material for it, ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.[11][12] The modern Lego brick design was patented on 28 January 1958.[15]
Bag 6 starts the airport terminal.  Like most CITY builds, they are meant for play so it's really only half a building.  It includes one minifigure and the revolving door entrance.  While the entrance is cool looking, it's about twice the height of a minifigure and there isn't enough physical space for one actually to fit through the door.  I'm not a fan of the design.
Attention then shifts to construction of the three aircraft. When I first spied this set I assumed that the two red jets were the same, but closer examination reveals a number of differences. First up is a red jet with a canard wing configuration as seen in the Saab Viggen amongst others. The lower fuselage is fashioned from a number of double and triple inverted 45 degree slopes with a pair of 1 x 14 Technic bricks running through the centre; there’s no obvious reason for Technic bricks to be used in this situation – standard 1 x 14 bricks would have done the job just as well - so I assume that LEGO just happened to have a bunch of them lying around…. A printed black 1 x 2 tile in the cockpit represents the instrument panel, while a substantial air intake is attached on either side of the fuselage at a 90 degree angle by way of brackets.
Attention then shifts to construction of the three aircraft. When I first spied this set I assumed that the two red jets were the same, but closer examination reveals a number of differences. First up is a red jet with a canard wing configuration as seen in the Saab Viggen amongst others. The lower fuselage is fashioned from a number of double and triple inverted 45 degree slopes with a pair of 1 x 14 Technic bricks running through the centre; there’s no obvious reason for Technic bricks to be used in this situation – standard 1 x 14 bricks would have done the job just as well - so I assume that LEGO just happened to have a bunch of them lying around…. A printed black 1 x 2 tile in the cockpit represents the instrument panel, while a substantial air intake is attached on either side of the fuselage at a 90 degree angle by way of brackets.
This detailed model features a classic red, black and grey colour scheme, large driver's cab with detailed dashboard, wing mirrors, opening tool storage compartment, 4-cylinder engine with moving pistons, twin-axle steering, double rear axle and chunky tires. Activate the boom to position the water cannon and extinguish the flames! This Power Functions upgradable model can be rebuilt to create an awesome Fire Rescue Vehicle!

There are 3 cardboard boxes with more Easter eggs. We get a few references to Marvel organisations such as A.I.M., who you may remember from Iron Man 3 as an R&D agency run by Aldrich Killian, Hammer, one of Stark Industries primary rivals which made an appearance in Iron Man 2, bankrolling Whiplash and finally a box with the Stark Industries logo on it.
There are several robotics competitions which use the Lego robotics sets. The earliest is Botball, a national U.S. middle- and high-school competition stemming from the MIT 6.270 Lego robotics tournament. Other Lego robotics competitions include Junior FIRST LEGO League (Jr.FLL) for students ages 6–9 and FIRST Lego League (FLL) for students ages 9–16 (age 9–14 in the United States, Canada, and Mexico). Jr.FLL and FLL offer real-world engineering challenges to participants. FLL uses Lego-based robots to complete tasks. Jr.FLL participants build models out of Lego elements. In its 2010 season, there were 16,070 FLL teams in over 55 countries. In its 2010 season, there were 2,147 Jr.FLL teams with 12,882 total student participants in the United States and Canada. The international RoboCup Junior football competition involves extensive use of Lego Mindstorms equipment which is often pushed to its extreme limits.[53]

Colour-wise, it is mainly yellow, with only a dash of green and red, and a little more white, there to break it up. The worker has space to stand and drive the vehicle, and has a walkie talkie attached on the side of the car. Around the other side is a coiled-up, what I assume is a, fuel pump. It looks pretty good when coiled up on the side of the car. Stickers come into use again here, this time for the number plates.


Honestly I have asked many of my friends and only a number even know about LEGO’s removal tool piece, and this is already an updated one from their previous grey piece. Friends, family, strangers – this is a lifesaver. It wouldn’t save you from stepping on a LEGO piece but it helps a tonne in getting pieces off of each other without damaging your nails. Or teeth. Don’t ask.
Here’s a look at the Iron Man and War Machine minifigures. Tony Stark is rocking his Mark 46 Armour which should delight LEGO Iron Man collectors as it’s another cool variant. If you ask me, I can’t quite tell most of the suits apart, but I do appreciate that LEGO give us a fresh new Iron Man minifig with each movie-themed set. Both Iron Man and War Machine are exclusive to this set.
The upper and lower wings are connected by a dark bluish grey 4 x 1 x 3 tail on either side; this tail element is unique to the set in this colour, although has previously appeared in a couple of sets back in 2003 in old dark grey. The upper wing is also supported by a couple of 1 x 2 x 2 black windows placed back to back in front of the cockpit, which from the perspective of the pilot really can’t be good for visibility. The biplane has a three blade propeller and the tips of the blades are stickered prior to sliding the propeller on to a 6L axle protruding from the front of the fuselage where it’s held in place by an orange 2 x 2 brick with domed top. The last step is to attach a 1 x 4 x 2 bar to the top of the upper wing for the Wing Walker to hold on to and then we’re done with the biplane.

Even in terms of play value it mostly seems to be a trade-off — 60104 loses the vending machine, cafe, baggage x-ray scanner, and a few seats on the plane but gains a baggage conveyor, a restroom, a refueling tank for the plane, an additional minifigure, and more seats in the waiting area. It's pretty nice to see the value of a LEGO air terminal remain fairly stable even though the price has not increased.
We are a collective bunch of geeks who love to share our passion with the rest of the world. Just like the Beholder we have adopted as our mascot, we have both depth and width of geeky topics we cover. By visiting this page, you declare yourself one of us! If you have grown up with a steady diet of all things related to video games, Star Wars, Star Trek, sci-fi, gadgets, toys, Transformers one way or another, this will be your second home.
LEGO City enables us all to remember why we fell in love with LEGO to begin with, to remember how we all first became exposed to LEGO; as a little kid, building our first house or giving our minifigures a hospital or a police station to work in. My first set was a garage, quickly followed by a police station. Having recently found these in storage, and keen to rebuild them, having the opportunity to build something not revolving around a Jedi or an Avenger is one I keen to take advantage of.
@josekalel: I think the size of the terminal is kept in check for price reasons more than anything. This is a $100 set, and while bigger and pricier City sets exist, they tend to be few in number. What's more, the disadvantage to having a plane wide enough to seat two rows of passengers is that it inevitably takes up a big portion of the budget even for a larger set like this one. If the set were just the airport with no plane, then the terminal could probably be around twice this size at the very least… but then the set would not offer such a complete play experience.
The final two minifigures are the Biplane Pilot and the intrepid Wing Walker. Both of these minifigures share the same white torso which is printed with a flight suit design overlaid with dark red and bright light orange flames plus a logo over the left breast. The torso design is superb and it can at present only be found in this set. Both minifigures are provided with a reddish brown aviator cap and dark bluish grey goggles, and the pilot (below left) also gets an alternative to this headgear in the form of medium dark flesh mid-length hair which has only ever appeared in five sets in this colour.
As is the norm with LEGO sets these days, there are a fair few stickers in use for this item. I’m still not a fan of their use, but at this point in time, it is something I have come to expect and just get on with it now. In their defence, they do add to the overall presentation, making it that little bit harder to complain. As I said, this is my favourite of the three planes in the set, mainly because it looks superb and offers a great build experience. Seriously, I had so much fun building this. The instructions – as always – are clear, and it is not going to provide any major issues. Stability-wise, there are no concerns here, with the finished product very sturdy and, as proved by my daughter, can handle itself when being flown around the room by an excited seven-year-old. One minifigure can be seated at the controls, with suitable space for application and removal. The other pilot has its place on the top of the plane, with a single piece of black fencing to provide support for the death-defying pilot.
The construction of the new airport was carried out during 1964 and the airport opened on 1 November, with one runway at 1660 meters in length and 45 meters width, a small platform where aircraft could be served, and a control tower to the controller. Hans Erik Christensen, the former chief pilot at LEGO became director, and the passengers were handled in LEGO's hangar until the first terminal building was opened in the spring of 1966. The airport was continuously expanded the following years, with new facilities, terminal buildings, lounge, tax-free area and hangars where LC Johansen's studio often participated as an architect (today called the Johannsen Architects), while other work was carried out by the airport's own studio.
×