Copenhagen is not only the main airport for the densely-populated Øresund region, but also the main air transportation hub for Scandinavia, the main hub for the joint Danish-Swedish-Norwegian carrier SAS Group, and one of Europe's major hubs. There is a large number of intercontinental connections to Copenhagen, as well as a dense network of short-haul connections from Copenhagen to destinations throughout all of Europe, especially the Nordic countries.
City is the thematic title under which most Town-related System sets were released from 2005 and onward. There are numerous sets that are associated with Construction, Police, Fire, Emergency, Train, Airport, Transportation, Cargo, Traffic, Coast Guard, Farm, Great Vehicles, Mining, and Space. European catalogs featured another theme called City in the years 1999 to 2000, which was referred to as City Center in American catalogs.
My personal favourite of the three planes included in this set, the design is superb and really captures the look and feel of the old-fashioned airplane that it is based on. The build isn’t too complex, and it really is a joy to see the final product come together. The plane has a distinct orange colour scheme, with some black and grey thrown in, and the shades work well together.
This detailed model features a classic red, black and grey colour scheme, large driver's cab with detailed dashboard, wing mirrors, opening tool storage compartment, 4-cylinder engine with moving pistons, twin-axle steering, double rear axle and chunky tires. Activate the boom to position the water cannon and extinguish the flames! This Power Functions upgradable model can be rebuilt to create an awesome Fire Rescue Vehicle!
It’s been three years since the release of the most recent City Airport set, namely, 60019 Stunt Plane, and a full six years since LEGO gave us a number of Airport releases at any one time. Of the five summer 2016 Airport releases, 60103 Airport Air Show was one of those that I was most interested to get my hands on, and I’m pleased to be able to bring you a review of it today.
This detailed model features a classic red, black and grey colour scheme, large driver's cab with detailed dashboard, wing mirrors, opening tool storage compartment, 4-cylinder engine with moving pistons, twin-axle steering, double rear axle and chunky tires. Activate the boom to position the water cannon and extinguish the flames! This Power Functions upgradable model can be rebuilt to create an awesome Fire Rescue Vehicle!
The Lego Group began in the workshop of Ole Kirk Christiansen (1891–1958), a carpenter from Billund, Denmark, who began making wooden toys in 1932.[7][8] In 1934, his company came to be called "Lego", derived from the Danish phrase leg godt, which means "play well". In 1947, Lego expanded to begin producing plastic toys.[9] In 1949 Lego began producing, among other new products, an early version of the now familiar interlocking bricks, calling them "Automatic Binding Bricks". These bricks were based on the Kiddicraft Self-Locking Bricks, which had been patented in the United Kingdom in 1939[10] and released in 1947. Lego had received a sample of the Kiddicraft bricks from the supplier of an injection-molding machine that it purchased.[11] The bricks, originally manufactured from cellulose acetate,[12] were a development of the traditional stackable wooden blocks of the time.[9]

Here’s a look at the Iron Man and War Machine minifigures. Tony Stark is rocking his Mark 46 Armour which should delight LEGO Iron Man collectors as it’s another cool variant. If you ask me, I can’t quite tell most of the suits apart, but I do appreciate that LEGO give us a fresh new Iron Man minifig with each movie-themed set. Both Iron Man and War Machine are exclusive to this set.

Last to be assembled is the hangar, which given its size is a surprisingly quick build – even though I’m a notoriously slow builder it took me barely ten minutes to put it together. The first step involves stacking dark bluish grey and orange plates and tiles to create a three-sided enclosure covering an area of 24 x 32 studs. Two side walls are then constructed from 1 x 6 x 5 rectangular girders topped off with dark bluish grey bricks and orange tiles, after which the roof is assembled, predominantly from a few large plates including a black 8 x 16 plate only previously available in two sets, and four dark bluish grey 6 x 24 plates which are only appearing in a set for the second time ever. A couple of stickers at the front of the structure identify it as an Airshow Hanger; to be frank, describing it as a hanger is probably exaggerating the case a bit as with its open front and rear it’s more akin to a large shelter.
With a price tag of £69.99/$79.99 and a piece count of 807 it means you’re paying roughly 8-9p/9-10cents per piece, which isn’t too bad when you look at it that way. This set is also quite unique in that it contains the spoilerific Giant Man brick built figure. Also in the set is the airport control tower, a baggage car and a smaller version of the Quinjet.
The final two minifigures are the Biplane Pilot and the intrepid Wing Walker. Both of these minifigures share the same white torso which is printed with a flight suit design overlaid with dark red and bright light orange flames plus a logo over the left breast. The torso design is superb and it can at present only be found in this set. Both minifigures are provided with a reddish brown aviator cap and dark bluish grey goggles, and the pilot (below left) also gets an alternative to this headgear in the form of medium dark flesh mid-length hair which has only ever appeared in five sets in this colour.
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