“lego 6862 _lego soon to be retired”

Legos in a complete set, who knew?. We had Legos as kids back in the ’60s & 70s. We would buy the blocks in very small sets as our allowance would slowly accumulate. My younger brother over time made some absolutely incredible creations using a mishmash of block sizes and styles. We would have wet our pants with happiness to receive an integrated SET. And this one is fantastic, especially being a Star Wars fan, having seen the original Star Wars movie in college over and over again…. Well worth the cost, and glad I have this set!!
Now that he has it open, it is a VERY impressive Lego set with 24 “little men” as they’re called in our house. There are not just bags of Legos but boxes of Legos at it is such a large set with over 3,800 pieces. The directions are in a spiral bound book, which could make the task of putting the set together look daunting, but he’s loving it. I’m loving that here it is mid-January and he’s still putting it together.
The best performers in both cases are sets that are no longer in production – with the price of the Mirkwood Elf Army set up a stonking 110% in the past 6 months according to Lego investing site BrickPicker.com .
“Build the highly detailed LEGO Star Wars X-wing Starfighter with folding wings, opening cockpit, display stand and R2-D2! Collect and create the most highly detailed LEGO Star Wars X-wing Starfighter ever produced. This iconic starfighter is featured… more
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Fun Factor: This was a really fun build. Because it is a microworld, you can easily tell what each piece represents as you are clicking them into place. Once complete, it’s really fun to create different arrangements with the modules. Even with just eight modules, you have quite a few options. I hope I can get a second one to customize the microworld even further.
Read Carefully- They will likely write that in the description -“this is a picture of a random sampling”.  Also be aware that you may not be getting “only” LEGOs.  If you don’t want to see Mega Blocks in the bag, read carefully.
Once you have an account, then you have to find the section in those websites where you can upload your wanted pieces list. In BrickStock you’ll first need to create a compatible XML file by selecting all pieces and going to File > Export > BrickLink XML.
We sell retired LEGO sets so that fans and collectors that missed out on a set while it was generally available can have a chance to own it.  LEGO typlically produces sets for 6-24 month cycles, then its retired forever.  If you like a current set, our advice is to buy it while its available from Lego.com, Amazon.com, Target, Toys R Us, etc.  We can’t compete with the big boys on current sets.  But if there’s something you wanted that is no longer in production, we’re here to help! 
This is another way of saying (and this is true for shoes or whisky): Buy retail. The secondary market is where you make your money. “The goal is to buy retail and on discount,” Maciorowski says. So that means hitting up local big-box stores and toy emporiums looking for sales, digging deep on the shelves of the Lego aisle for whatever’s being sold now and might be sold for more later. Windfalls happen when you find a gem or rarity at retail price and sit on it.
Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Darth Vader, and Princess Leia hold iconic status in the Star Wars universe. LEGO Star Wars minifigures allow movie fans to collect and play with their favorite slowed down for 2001. In 2000 we got 19 sets, but in 2001 only 10 were released, two of which came from the Technic line, C-3PO (#8007) and Stromtrooper (#8008), and two USC sets, Darth Maul (#10018) and the Rebel Blockade Runner (#10019). Darth Maul, with 1,868 parts, was now the largest LEGO Star Wars set to have been released.
You can also order individual bricks from Lego.com, but the wall in the store gets you a better price. Another option for bulk buying is to order on ebay or from sites like BrickLink. (I’ve not done the latter, so I can’t verify the success of that approach; please use caution in your purchases.)
I think you’d find that because of specilist parts that are in the UCS models, that as has been said before, require special molds, it wouldn’t be worth carrying on production. They need to modernise after all. So if something’s new then sacrifice something old for it surely ? 🙂
Probably a silly question, but can’t Judith buy from the US site? I’ve often wondered. I grew up in Germany and England, so the regional sets would interest me. A central site offering all sets to everyone would be nice.
Stir the pieces around once an hour. Stirring the small pieces around with a stick or gloved hand will dislodge the bubbles causing them to float. Try this every hour or so for best results. If you leave pieces floating too long, they can develop a cloudy white marking along the water line.[6]
My solution to ensure some creative Harry Potter-themed Lego fun without breaking the bank has used all of the above sources. First, I showed my daughter the downloadable plans for all the Harry Potter Lego sets which gives her great ideas, and helps her build approximations of them with our old Legos (we have tons, including a lot from my own childhood — one of Lego’s many virtues is that it’s practically indestructible!). Then, I ordered some special parts and figures from Bricklink (spiral staircases, Gryffindor banners, the Fat-Lady’s portrait hole, chocolate frogs, etc.), scored one small lot of mixed Harry Potter Lego pieces at a reasonable price on eBay, and found the rest of the pieces we needed on the lego.com site (where we got a free gift). I then left it up to my kids’ imaginations to build their own Hogwarts. The colors might be a mixed bag, but all their friends ooh and aah when they come over, and I haven’t heard one word of complaint.
Lego 21102 Minecraft Micro World Create, explore and play in a Minecraft microbuild! Build a mini model of the game that’s sweeping the Internet with a LEGO® microbuild version of Minecraft! Selected by LEGO CUUSOO members, this build features a cool design with lots of 1×1 LEGO tiles and 2…
Recreate the action and adventure of the Star Wars movies with the ultimate Death Star playset! This amazingly detailed battle station features an incredible array of minifigure-scale scenes, moving parts, characters and accessories from Episodes IV and VI on its multiple decks, including the Death Star control room, rotating turbolaser turrets, hangar bay with TIE Advanced starfighter, tractor beam controls, Emperor’s throne room, detention block, firing laser cannon, Imperial conference chamber, droid maintenance facility, and the powerful Death Star superlaser…plus much more! Swing across the chasm with Luke and Leia, face danger in the crushing trash compactor, and duel with Darth Vader for the fate of the galaxy!
This is really interesting. I guess the research is the most important part to see if it makes sense to reconstruct a set vs. just buying it on the secondary market. Personally I wouldn’t mind substituting parts when they are too expensive or hard to find. Lego sets are really just an idea to start with anyway.
Now I know I said the project can move forward, however I like to do one more step just so there are no unpleasant surprises. This step involves taking a look at the parts in a set. For this I use the BrickLink. I click Catalog at the BrickLink website and then find the set by either browsing the categories or entering the set number in the search box. Once I find its page, I click on the View Inventory link. Seeing all the parts in the set laid out on one page lets me look for expensive and/or unusual elements. There are no prices immediately listed on this page and I doubt anyone wants to click through and see prices for each part, but I look for three main criteria: rare part design, rare part color, and large quantity.
I haven’t been a collector for long, but I’m a hard-core Star Wars fan since I saw Episode VI in the cinema when I was 5 years old. I didn’t know it then, but a LEGO collection was in my long distant future.
The Ewoks were some fierce little warriors and now you can build that epic battle on the forest moon of Endor with this 890-LEGO piece! You get 12 minfigs, including Han Solo, Princess Leia, Chewbacca, R2-D2 (classic deco), 2 Rebel commandos, 2 scout troopers, Death Star Trooper, and 3 Ewoks.
A great source of individual parts (new and used) is Bricklink, an online network of stores who sell Lego piece by piece, as well as some complete sets. You’ll find almost everything cheaper than eBay here.
That would be great, but I doubt LEGO would ever make it for the reasons you mentioned. Having said that, if a LEGO Ideas Hunger Games project would make it to 10,000, LEGO might consider a one-time set. 😉
LEGO released their first entry into the Star Wars Ultimate Collector Series back in 2000 and found they had created a big hit with collectors and adult fans of LEGO. While those initial sets were not nearly as popular as the current UCS collection, it was enough to create a long running series of models with new releases every year. The popularity of the series has grown ever since and exploded in recent years. It has grown to the point that many Star Wars UCS sets represent the best LEGO investments, with even recent entries showing excellent growth after retirement.
Lego employee here. If you have a Lego store near you, look at the price tags. If it has the top left corner cut off, it’s going to be retiring soon from our shelves. It’ll be available online and then discontinued for good after that. Hope this helps!

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