“lego 2002 +recently discontinued lego sets”

Our first entry from outside of the movies, Captain Rex’s AT-TE is a fantastic set pulled from the Star Wars Rebels animated television series.  Rex was introduced in The Clone Wars animated movie, but this set has an aging Rex from the Rebels animated series.  This set won’t appeal to everyone, as many might not follow the animated series, but for fans of the show, this AT-TE really hits the mark.  The sheer amount of cool stuff going on here should appease any Lego fan.  The spring-loaded shooters are always awesome, but this behemoth also packs on a couple of cranes, loading doors, and six moveable legs.  Moving this thing around is a lot of fun.  The minifigurines are Rex himself, of course, along with his partners Gregor and Wolffe and two Imperials two give chase; an Inquisitor Fifth Brother (with lightsaber) and Stormtrooper.  This set is a slam dunk for fans of Rebels, but is just plain fun for any Lego fan.
Looks like I’m safe. Already have at least one of each of all of these, and have gotten a second of the ones I really like (e.g. Wall-E and Doctor Who). Surprised to see the Sandcrawler go so soon though (assuming it’s retired at the same time as the Ewok Village).
The design uses a fair amount of interlocking within each tower and wall section, allowing them to stand up to play fairly well. The sections fit together with each other in a modular way. With a throne room, treasure room, prison, two catapults, arbalest, postern gate, and a working drawbridge and portcullis in the main gate, there is tremendous play value in the castle. However, don’t try to pick up the castle as a whole to move it, as that will cause it to come apart around the joints between the sections. Slide it onto something flat and solid instead.
Luke’s Landspeeder (75173):  There’s a lot to love here with the classic landspeeder build which also includes three classic minifigurines: Luke, C3PO, and Obi-Wan (or Ben, if you prefer) Kenobi. The Tusken Raider also looks fantastic.
But I did it for my kids.  Number 1 Son loves LEGOs.  So many children do but do parents and teachers love LEGO too?  Maybe, but how about buying LEGO?  I am not in love with shopping for LEGOs- it’s work!  For one, those sets make me crazy.  They are so expensive and after they fall apart (because no child will let you glue them), there are many pieces that are not open-ended enough to inspire more building.
➡ LEGO FRIENDS SETS ON SALE: A number of LEGO Friends sets are also retiring soon and are on sale, including the large #41134 LEGO Friends Heartlake Performance School (with a school bus!), the #41132 LEGO Friends Heartlake Party Shop, and a few small but sweet sets, like the #41305 LEGO Friends Emma’s Photo Studio. You can find them under the LEGO Friends section or under Sales and Deals at the Online LEGO Shop.
LEGO Mindstorms NXT 2.0 (8547)Take LEGO to the next level with MINDSTORMS NXT 2.0. Combining the versatility of the LEGO building system with a microcomputer brick and intuitive programming software, …
LEGO Ideas 20306 Beatles Yellow Submarine an excellent representation of the iconic Yellow Submarine from the famous 1968 film! Yellow submarine features a removable top cockpit that fits all four Beatles minifigures, four rotating periscopes, two rotating propellers and… Continue Reading →
Try the LEGO Adventure Book by Megan Rothrock.  Get them inspired, let them create their own thing and then sell it!  What an awesome lesson. If you ever want to save money, tell them to think like a designer and let them experience what it means to sell an idea by trying to sell their own!  My kid donated his creation to the school weekly flea market.  While he didn’t profit personally, he got major compliments at school. (WIN!)  He’s making a name for himself and hopefully he’ll get custom orders! Hooray for geekiness!
Off topic, but does anyone else want Lego Hunger Games, with the movie coming out yesterday and all? I guess it’s not a good idea, because little kids can’t associate the right sadness or thought that the story requires, while they’re playing with a Lego set. I still want them, but my own Lego versions of the characters will suffice.
This item may have minor scuff marks on it, but still looks very good. WARNING – LEGO pieces are intended and rated for children 5 years and up. Be advised that LEGO parts should not be swallowed as it can present a choking hazard.
Now I know I said the project can move forward, however I like to do one more step just so there are no unpleasant surprises. This step involves taking a look at the parts in a set. For this I use the BrickLink. I click Catalog at the BrickLink website and then find the set by either browsing the categories or entering the set number in the search box. Once I find its page, I click on the View Inventory link. Seeing all the parts in the set laid out on one page lets me look for expensive and/or unusual elements. There are no prices immediately listed on this page and I doubt anyone wants to click through and see prices for each part, but I look for three main criteria: rare part design, rare part color, and large quantity.
Fair enough, and before the internet I think that would be a valid point. I personally cannot see how paying more makes collecting more fun? Its not like you work harder (other than for your money) to buy it. Instead of buying from one web site you just buy from another.
In addition to BrickLink, which is almost certainly the largest LEGO specific venue other than the LEGO company itself, and has 4 million lots as of this writing, you may find that Bonanza.com has some listings of sets as well
So what do you think? Do you keep track and take advantage of LEGO sets that are getting retired or are on sale? Have you found some great deals? Feel free to share and discuss in the comment section below! 😉
Now that the LEGO set is picked out and you have the instructions, the next step is to do a bit of research. Start by finding out what the going rate for the set is on the secondary market. My personal go-tos are BrickLink and eBay. The price-guide on these websites will give you a gauge that you can use to decide which makes more sense: buy the set as a whole, or piece it together yourself. For example, I wanted to build the #10185 LEGO Modular Green Grocer that has been retired years ago. The piece-count for this sets is 2352 pieces, and the price back in 2008 was $150. Now on the secondary market I found the lowest prices around the mid $700s with a good majority at the $800 mark – this is for used sets. New condition sets go well over a $1,000. I felt there was plenty of room to find some savings.
This set contains 996 pieces, spread between 10 numbered bags and one unnumbered bag of base plates. The instructions are printed on three booklets, bound to a sheet of cardboard. No paperweights required. Also included is a sheet of stickers with brick patterns, as well as a sheet of malleable plastic with three flags.
Also included is set # 6210 Jabba’s Sail Barge. This set is mostly complete, missing all the mini figs except Jabba and missing one piece from the skiff (the light grey control panel) but I substituted another piece.
How does the new 75205 Mos Eisley Cantina compare to the original 4501 and the more recent 75052 sets? In this review, Brook Johnson will review 75205 (0:53), check out its stats (2:17), guess at retirement (3:42), compare it to the first 2 Cantinas (5:44), and discuss how makes effect collectors and inve
If the sets have been used (pre-built) I would try Craigslist first to see if there is a local buyer. If you luck out you will have an end-buyer who just genuinely wants the sets you have for themselves and they are willing to pay a bit more for used sets, or you can sell them to a reseller for a bulk price. If you want top dollar you can list on eBay, but it will take up a lot of your time.
I bought this for my 4 year old son for Yule. Since he’s not quite ready to assemble these sets yet, I was pleased to see that the pieces were conveniently bagged in a way that would facilitate assembly. Bag number 1 contains the figures, which gave my son something to play with while the rest of the set was being assembled. Bags numbers 2 through 10 could then be opened in order, assembling the structure from each bag before opening the next. The base plates are in a separate bag but they are large enough that they are unlikely to be lost. Having only one bag open at a time – with the smaller pieces in a smaller baglet within that bag – greatly reduced the chances of losing a piece, and in fact only one piece was lost during assembly by mommy, daddy, and 6 year old big sister, despite the attempts of 2 year old brozilla.
I’m a big lego fan and really like this castle. The only problem with it really is that the Gate section falls apart easily, which is a pain because it takes a long time to build. I added some solid bricks on the inside of the gate walls and that helped give it more stability. The kids in my 5 – 7 year old classroom loved it, as does my daughter.
AUSTIN, TX – MARCH 10: SXSW Attendees Join The Rebellion Through An All-New Immersive Adventure by ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,’ March 10-12 at Grimes Studio on March 10, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/Getty Images for Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment )

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