“death star lego discontinued +lego nba”

This item may have minor scuff marks on it, but still looks very good. WARNING – LEGO pieces are intended and rated for children 5 years and up. Be advised that LEGO parts should not be swallowed as it can present a choking hazard.
I’m a big lego fan and really like this castle. The only problem with it really is that the Gate section falls apart easily, which is a pain because it takes a long time to build. I added some solid bricks on the inside of the gate walls and that helped give it more stability. The kids in my 5 – 7 year old classroom loved it, as does my daughter.
The components come down to “what’s in the box?”  This is an important aspect of any Lego set, but arguably even more so in a licensed theme like Star Wars.  As a fan of the movies, you know the sets before you start building them.  Sets which have the perfect balance of nostalgia and just plain cool features will inevitably rise to the top for us.  For more info and reviews please visit our friends at Ninja Brick and read their Star Wars reviews.
➡ LEGO ANGRY BIRDS SETS ON SALE: The entire LEGO Angry Birds line is on sale. While Angry Birds may not be everyone’s cup of tea, there are some interesting pieces in these sets you might like, so it’s worth checking them out just for the parts. You can find them under the LEGO Angry Birds section or under Sales and Deals at the Online LEGO Shop.
My kid is selling this bridge to me.  Not giving, selling. I’ve created an Entrepe-Monster.  Who started this? Me, but I had help. Check out Megan Rothrock’s The LEGO Adventure book in the background. Just one look at this bridge and he made his own.
Lego 21002 Architecture Empire State Building Build the Empire State Building! The Empire State Building joins the LEGO Architecture Landmark series of real-world construction models! Standing 7.4″ (188 mm) tall, New York City’s famous skyscraper is built from tan bricks on a striking 3.1″ (80 mm) gray and black base…
Sorry, you’re gonna have to shell out more cash to really make the most of your model. Get these: 4-6 more Stormtroopers, more imperial officers, an extra Luke and Han in ST disguise, an extra Leia and Darth Vader, and a few others that you like. I added about a dozen more. Be careful that you get minis that match the style of 10188.
To me “Retiring Soon” label was the latest promotional tool from LEGO Shop at Home to entice people to buy older sets WITHOUT loss of profit (via discounts).  Since it is just a promo tool, it does not need to be 100% reliable.
I use savings websites/apps like Walmart Savings Catcher, IBotta, Checkout51, Microsoft Rewards (Bing Search) to earn gift cards. I then use the gift cards to purchase Lego for my son’s birthday and Christmas presents. I match the gift cards with low-price sales at Amazon, Walmart, or ToysRUs.
Try the LEGO Adventure Book by Megan Rothrock.  Get them inspired, let them create their own thing and then sell it!  What an awesome lesson. If you ever want to save money, tell them to think like a designer and let them experience what it means to sell an idea by trying to sell their own!  My kid donated his creation to the school weekly flea market.  While he didn’t profit personally, he got major compliments at school. (WIN!)  He’s making a name for himself and hopefully he’ll get custom orders! Hooray for geekiness!
In 2000 we got our first two UCS sets, the X-wing Fighter (#7191) and the TIE Interceptor (#7181). This X-wing fighter was the largest LEGO Star Wars set to date with 1,300 pieces. That year also saw the first Technic Star Wars sets in the form of a Pit Droid (#8000), Battle Droid (#8001), and Destroyer Droid (#8002). In total 19 sets were released in 2000, including the first LEGO System version of the Slave I (#7144) and Millennium Falcon (#7190). This year also saw the first LEGO Star Wars key rings to be released which included Darth Vader (not included in set counts).
This is really interesting. I guess the research is the most important part to see if it makes sense to reconstruct a set vs. just buying it on the secondary market. Personally I wouldn’t mind substituting parts when they are too expensive or hard to find. Lego sets are really just an idea to start with anyway.
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What can i say my daughter loves minecraft. its a hit with the kids. this little play-set is awesome my daughter loves having it set up in her room. the quality is great and it looks really cool when assembled. lego has never failed on quality and they dident stop here its made great like any lego set has been made. just a word of caution it does have small pieces. so would not recomend for really young kids. buy its an amazing lego set to go for minecraft. great job lego.
Above all, make sure the listing states that the lot is 99% or 100% genuine Lego Brand.  If they didn’t state that in their description, then take the time to e-mail them to ask.  It is definitely worth it!
After reading a couple of interesting posts I thought I would toss my own thoughts on what the Lego.com retiring soon moniker means to me.  To me this is definitely going to be the bane of the secondary market in time.  It indicates to everyone interested in Lego that their time is nearly up to purchase particular sets.  It also indicates to resellers that the time to buy is now.  I’m sure there will be the usual procrastinators inside of there yet, but I think overall less.  I think that for every one person who buys one knowing that a set will soon be retired there will be another reseller buying two of them to hopefully sell to the person that missed that time window.  If Lego stays on top of and consistent with their labeling of sets ‘retiring soon’ it will definitely start to take the steam out of the secondary market and make buying and holding a regular occurrence with the majority of sets.  (this is not meant to be a bubble thread)  I apologize in advance if it somehow evolves into that or an ethical debate.  Overall this doesn’t bother me, just one of those things I’ve given a moments thought to.
I can give you some info. If you want a specific set check it weekly at the Lego store. It will get a retiring soon tag (not sold out or hard to get tags those are different). Past that check fan sites like this one, but don’t take anything said on as the final truth.
Twenty-two years after Star Wars was released, LEGO and Lucasfilm worked together to produce products in time for the release of Episode I in May 1999. The first sets were released under the LEGO System brand and consisted of eight sets from Episode I and five sets (13 in total) from the original trilogy films, including the first LEGO Star Wars X-wing (#7140) and Snowspeeder (#7130). Both of these sets have been revisited again many times in minifigure scale, MINI or even Ultimate Collectors Series (UCS) form — each new release bringing new features, new minifigures and new colored bricks and pieces too.
Megan, thanks for sharing! Yes, postage fees can really add up if you don’t manage your wanted list right. Good suggestion about buying parts for several projects at the same time. Have fun with piecing together those awesome sets! 🙂
The LEGO is an impressive pirate ship from Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean movie. It features a hinged bow section, opening skeleton hull with decay and destruction detailing, movable rudder, collapsible main mast, and two further masts. Other features include a long bowsprit with crow’s nest and mast, tattered sails, detailed quarterdeck, plus a rowboat with two oars. Weapons include two gray swords, three black swords, a pistol and the Silent Mary Masthead’s shield and sword elements. [ 332 more words ]
While not as big as the 10179 Millennium Falcon, this Episode III one is still a great addition for any collector. With 985 pieces, if you get your hands on one, you’ve got a very rare set since it’s now retired and hard to find!
Many of the classic Lego Star Wars sets are now discontinued, with some of the vintage build-your-own kits having appreciated in value to the point where it might be cheaper to construct a real-life Death Star instead.
So now that we’re at the stage where we have a budget and we are convinced that this is a good idea that won’t break the bank, it’s time to get organized. For this I recommend using some of the tools on BrickLink. You can part out the set into a wanted list by clicking the Part Out link on the set’s page. Here we can choose various options like do we want minifigures listed as fully assembled, do we want to be notified when new items get listed, do we want boxes and instruction-manuals in our list, etc. I also like to make the minimum quantity wanted the same as what is on the list. That way I know how much is needed without having to look up the set every time.

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