“canceled lego sets lego sets retiring 2016”

Lego Star Wars Millennium Falcon Retiring Soon Lego is proud to present the largest and most detailed model ever created. It is the ultimate Star Wars Millennium Falcon that is built by joining a total of 7,500 bricks. This model has made it to the list of the biggest Lego Models of all times. The Millennium …
Once upon a time, I bought a HUGE bin of used LEGOs for just $25 dollars.  It must have been over 15 lbs. I was so happy.  It was disgustingly dirty though… I had to wash them three times in my tub. The previous owner had a cat and I’m allergic.  That was hard.
This set contains 996 pieces, spread between 10 numbered bags and one unnumbered bag of base plates. The instructions are printed on three booklets, bound to a sheet of cardboard. No paperweights required. Also included is a sheet of stickers with brick patterns, as well as a sheet of malleable plastic with three flags.
What about rebrickable.com? This can store your entire collection, tell you what pieces you have missing from any set and create a shopping list at specific brick link or brick owl vendors. Super handy!
In order to hold the pieces I pull for the project, I typically use a sturdy zip-lock style bag. I actually found the two gallon variety works amazingly well for large sets. As I go through the list, I’m either clicking the delete box when I have all the pieces or I’m moving the quantity I still need into the comment box from the minimum quantity wanted. The reason for this move has to do with how BrickLink functions. If you keep the amount only in the minimum quantity wanted box, it only shows that element if that quantity is reached in a particular store. So even if the store has some of the pieces you need, it will not show up if you have the minimum quantity box filled with a higher number. Unlike the minimum quantity box, the comment box is only a brief note. So no matter how many pieces a store has, their inventory will show up in your search results. And the nice thing is that your note will also show right under where you would indicate how much of each piece you want.
Separate the pieces. Detach all pieces from each other unless they are stuck by grime. Set aside all pieces with stickers, printed ink, moving parts, electrical parts, or clear plastic. These must be scrubbed with a dry towel or alcohol wipes to avoid damage from the tumbling.
The 501st Clone Trooper is on patrol with Star WarsTM: The Clone WarsTM edition Yoda and the powerful AT-RT walker when he spots a Commando Droid captain and Sniper Droid. Use the AT-RT’s swiveling laser cannon to attack the Droid. more
It’s free advice but make sure you do the math! You will hopefully have better luck than me because it is confusing!  Most sellers are pros but once in a while, you might get someone looking to unload a stash.  Be ready for that.
Sometimes you may run into the with a piece that is just not convenient to get. Or it is possible that facing $3 per piece is bit hard to swallow. Thankfully there are a number of work-around solutions to problems like these. The first is finding if there is a part with a Matching ID (MID). If you go to the parts inventory of the set on BrickLink, parts with a MID have a mark in a column to the far right. This means that if you go to the very bottom of the inventory you can find parts that are slightly different (like they have hollow studs instead of filled or they have a few extra notches), but essentially they will look and act identical.
There are a lot of reasons that LEGO might stop producing a set, and I would assume it’s a balance between the cost of doing production runs of the necessary pieces, the projected volume of sales, and their availability of SKUs.
Architecture City Creator Disney Princess Duplo Elves Friends Ideas Juniors The Lego Batman Movie The Lego Ninjago Movie Mindstorms Minecraft Minifigures Modular Buildings Nexo Knights Ninjago Speed Champions Star Wars Super Heroes Technic Trains
Why would LEGO discontinue sets that are still insanely popular? Example being the UCS Millenium Falcon. It would obviously still sell, look at the prices it is commanding online now. Seems to me LEGO is giving up profits. I know some people buy sets hoping the price will rise, and that is all well and good, but some of us just really enjoy assembling, displaying and looking at our collections. I am like a few others in here that have an entire room devoted to LEGO. I have sets I could sell but honestly I probably never will. I find myself alot just sitting there looking around at my sets and honestly it really relaxes me. Same with building. I am married and have 5 daughters…..yes….DAUGHTERS and when I am building I can just focus on that and ignore the chaos around me. It is very theraputic. Anyways, I got a little side tracked, as far as my original question does anyone know why LEGO would intentionally stop the most popular sets, and what are your opinions about this? Also, and I know no one can know for sure, but what do you think the chances are that they would ever re-release the UCS sets?
The LEGO Education 779389 1,907-piece community starter set includes elements that children four years and older can use to design and build a community with houses, streets, cars, shops, a theme park, a zoo, and more, while developing imagination and cre more
While you are researching prices, keep in mind that if you plan to stretch out building a set over months or years, equaling the going rate of the set is not a bad thing. However even if you are doing things the long way, you should never spend more than the going rate. Your personal preferences may differ, but essentially you are giving up more LEGO pieces when you spend more. Once your budget is established, you can then determine if the project is worth your time. You know what you like to spend and what you are capable of affording. This early stage is a final check to figure out whether or not you will move forward with the project.
I do not pay attention to it. When I think of retiring soon, I think that the set will EOL in the next week to month. From what I am seeing, Lego puts the retiring soon label just to sell more of that specific set, with no indication that the set will retire soon. Also, they keep the label on for forever. I have seen labels on some sets for months, and they say that the set is retiring soon. Let’s rethink that.
Any Lego Star Wars set that is still readily available, i.e. not retired, in 2017 could qualify for our list.  That is a pretty broad list and we did consider quite a few, but there are some other ways we narrowed it down.  There are a couple of dozen sets which are little more than a minifigure and a small ship or another accessory.  If one of these blew us away, we would consider it, but given the wealth of options available, that didn’t happen.  
Those magazines are available for free directly from LEGO, so they don’t have much value. They sell for less than a dollar on eBay. An other problem with a collection of magazine is that they are very heavy to ship, thus expensive. You would be better off listing them on Craiglist to see if there is anyone locally who is interested, or just donate them to your local library. Kids would appreciate them. 🙂

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