“buy lego bionicle +lego town”

➡ LEGO NINJAGO SETS ON SALE: Getting ready for The LEGO Ninjago Movie sets means clearing out some of the old stock related to the TV show. You can find some really great sets on sale like the #70595 LEGO Ninjago Ultra Stealth Raider, the #70605 LEGO Ninjago Misfortune’s Keep, the #70604 LEGO Ninjago Tiger Widow Island, the #70603 LEGO Ninjago Raid Zeppelin and more. You can find them under the LEGO Ninjago section or under Sales and Deals at the Online LEGO Shop.
4+ Agents Adventurers Alpha Team Aqua Raiders Aquazone Atlantis Avatar: The Last Airbender Baby Batman Belville Bionicle Cars Castle Dino Dino Attack Exo-Force Fabuland Fusion Games Harry Potter Hero Factory The Hobbit Homemaker Indiana Jones Jurassic World Legends of Chima The Lego Movie The Lord of the Rings Mars Mission Mickey Mouse Mixels Monster Fighters Ninja Paradisa Pharaoh’s Quest Pirates Pirates of the Caribbean Power Miners Prince of Persia Quatro Racers RoboRiders Rock Raiders Scooby-Doo The Simpsons Slizer/Throwbots Space Spider-Man Speed Racer SpongeBob SquarePants Sports Spybotics Studios Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Time Cruisers Toy Story Ultra Agents Vikings Wild West World Racers Znap
Finally, look for high quantities of a piece in the parts-list. My rule of thumb is to look at anything that uses double digits – so 10 or more. Many times I can disregard small pieces like 1×1 bricks that I know I have plenty of. Once you parts you are concerned about, click on that part’s number, select the right color, and see what they are selling for. It is important to keep an eye on the country the seller is from since shipping will eat at your budget faster than anything else. It was during this time I discovered that I not only needed fifty 1×8 sand-green bricks, but that they were each about $2.50. After $125 total for that, I discovered I also needed fifty-six 1×2 sand-green bricks with a groove. They were just as expensive. Not great for my budget. And even after being able to identify some of these obvious expensive pieces, you can still run into rare parts you might not have expected. In the case of the #10185 LEGO Modular Green Grocer, there was a blue arch piece that came in very few other sets, thus it was expensive.
Oh, Bat Lords! That was an awesome theme! Love their helmets! I have a couple of them myself. BTW, eBay is a great place to pick up older sets for cheap! I have gotten some gorgeous sets from the Viking line (love those!) and also the Orient Expedition Dragon Fortress and two copies of the Scorpion Palace. 😀
Twenty-two years after Star Wars was released, LEGO and Lucasfilm worked together to produce products in time for the release of Episode I in May 1999. The first sets were released under the LEGO System brand and consisted of eight sets from Episode I and five sets (13 in total) from the original trilogy films, including the first LEGO Star Wars X-wing (#7140) and Snowspeeder (#7130). Both of these sets have been revisited again many times in minifigure scale, MINI or even Ultimate Collectors Series (UCS) form — each new release bringing new features, new minifigures and new colored bricks and pieces too.
Build Quality: Pretty solid, I’m happy to say. This set does not sacrifice build quality for detail (which many LEGO sets unfortunately do). You may find that the tree tops pop off when you’re rearranging the different modules, but everything else sticks solid.
When our kids were little and Legos (built and unbuilt) were scattered across the floor, we referred to them as our low tech burglar alarm. No one but a parent used to a Lego filled floor could have navigated without pain (or heavy work boots!)
We are paying top dollar for sealed LEGO sets. We have a complete list of prices we are paying for sealed Star Wars LEGO sets. We are working on a more comprehensive list of prices that we are paying for other LEGO categories from the last 10 years or so, which we expect to have ready in July. For now, just send us a list at buying@brianstoys.com of the LEGO sets that you have for sale, and we will be happy to issue a price-quote within several days. For a limited time we are offering FREE shipping on your first box shipped to us by UPS, and we offer our account for discounted UPS rates on all of your other cartons shipped.
Rescue broken-down drivers in style with the powerful American-style Pick-up Tow Truck. This LEGO Pick-Up Truck is a realistic model that features working steering, a folding tow lift, a working winch, opening doors and a hood that opens to reveal a… more
Yeah, I can imagine there’s gonna be a lot of these bigger sets on clearance this year. I actually bought the slave 1 during force Friday because the guy in the Lego shop heavily hinted it was going to be discontinued, and was considering the Temple of Airjitzu for the same reason.
Ewok village is not a ucs kit. Why do people say these kits are ucs just because they are £200 If it does. It have a ucs label on the box it’s not ucs. The 10 part number association stopped in 2014. Ewok village is such a good set though.
If the sets have been used (pre-built) I would try Craigslist first to see if there is a local buyer. If you luck out you will have an end-buyer who just genuinely wants the sets you have for themselves and they are willing to pay a bit more for used sets, or you can sell them to a reseller for a bulk price. If you want top dollar you can list on eBay, but it will take up a lot of your time.
Of the four current “UCS” sets, I prefer the Slave and the TIE. I think of the other two as “play sets” and they just don’t look as cool. Of course, the higher price points of Hoth and the DS might make them rarer and better investments. However, given this is the 3rd (?) large DS model, I’m wondering if it will be all that sought after in retirement. What do you guys think?
2005 also saw the release of the first video game based on a themed Star Wars toy line by the LEGO Group — and what became the first in the franchise written by Traveller’s Tales (TT Games). This release featured a game adaptation of all three prequel films based on their LEGO incarnations and hit stores a month before the theatrical release of Episode III. Versions released for Microsoft Xbox, Sony PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows PC, Nintendo Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, and Apple Mac were all published by Eidos Interactive and LucasArts, and were a great new way to play with your favorite characters from a galaxy, far, far away.
Bigger, maybe but a different question. I would imagine why they remove them entirely is because by leaving the items in and just marking them “sold out” or whatever would be confusing to non-collectors or would solicit a ton of “When will you get more X?” questions. – Nathan Stohlmann Jan 2 ’12 at 15:19
Aye, Lego mateys! When it comes to purchasing this amazing ship, Lego collectors and pirate lovers are ready to ‘walk the plank’ and dive in. Released in 1993, this set includes a large three-masted pirate ship, nine pirate figurines, a rowboat, a shark, and much more. This ship is armed with four cannons that are mounted on turntables that slide from port to starboard. Included on either side of the poop deck are two smaller non-functional cannons.
Now that the LEGO set is picked out and you have the instructions, the next step is to do a bit of research. Start by finding out what the going rate for the set is on the secondary market. My personal go-tos are BrickLink and eBay. The price-guide on these websites will give you a gauge that you can use to decide which makes more sense: buy the set as a whole, or piece it together yourself. For example, I wanted to build the #10185 LEGO Modular Green Grocer that has been retired years ago. The piece-count for this sets is 2352 pieces, and the price back in 2008 was $150. Now on the secondary market I found the lowest prices around the mid $700s with a good majority at the $800 mark – this is for used sets. New condition sets go well over a $1,000. I felt there was plenty of room to find some savings.
Hey, I had the same thought as you. The set it way too expensive to buy and I want to actually have it assembled, not for collecting. Would you be able to share with me how you were able to get all the pieces and obtain the instructions?
I do not pay attention to it. When I think of retiring soon, I think that the set will EOL in the next week to month. From what I am seeing, Lego puts the retiring soon label just to sell more of that specific set, with no indication that the set will retire soon. Also, they keep the label on for forever. I have seen labels on some sets for months, and they say that the set is retiring soon. Let’s rethink that.
Despite my earlier hesitations, the tinkling sound of Lego pieces being sorted and scooped is a happy sound to me, a remembrance of hours and hours of intense, creative play by my sons. And now my youngest daughter.
For me, secondary market is a blessing. I have a chance to buy retired technic sets thanks to collectors and investors and i don’t have a problem with paying an extra cash for those sets i call it “delay tax” because i just came out of my Dark Ages.
The UCS Sandcrawler was just released two years ago! I think that UCS sets should stay around for at least 4-5 years so people who don’t have $400 right away can save up. As for the others, I don’t have WALL-E yet, so I might need to act quickly (even though my brother has it). Thanks for the news!
In addition to BrickLink, which is almost certainly the largest LEGO specific venue other than the LEGO company itself, and has 4 million lots as of this writing, you may find that Bonanza.com has some listings of sets as well

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *