“best lego investments _lego building”

Those magazines are available for free directly from LEGO, so they don’t have much value. They sell for less than a dollar on eBay. An other problem with a collection of magazine is that they are very heavy to ship, thus expensive. You would be better off listing them on Craiglist to see if there is anyone locally who is interested, or just donate them to your local library. Kids would appreciate them. 🙂
What about rebrickable.com? This can store your entire collection, tell you what pieces you have missing from any set and create a shopping list at specific brick link or brick owl vendors. Super handy!
With no new film in 2003, the number of sets released was reduced to 20 of which 8 were MINI sets (in plastic boxes) featuring iconic Star Wars vehicles from the five films released to date.  Four of these sets came as two packs featuring matched pairs of vehicles such as X-wing Fighter & Tie Advanced (#4484), Sebulba’s Podracer & Anakin’s Podracer (#4485), AT-ST & Snowspeeder (#4486) and Jedi Starfighter & Slave I (#4487) — each one of these sets included extra pieces to create a TIE Bomber. The other four Mini sets featured larger vehicles such as the Millennium Falcon (#4488) and AT-AT (#4489). 2003 also saw the release of the largest minifigure to date — Jabba the Hutt — as part of the Jabba’s Palace set (#4480) and also the first large scale AT-AT (#4483). Two USC were also released during the year, the Rebel Snowspeeder (#10129) and the elusive Cloud City set (#10123), the latter of which includes a uniquely printed Boba Fett minifigure which is very hard to find (and one of the few sets I still don’t own).
After reading a couple of interesting posts I thought I would toss my own thoughts on what the Lego.com retiring soon moniker means to me.  To me this is definitely going to be the bane of the secondary market in time.  It indicates to everyone interested in Lego that their time is nearly up to purchase particular sets.  It also indicates to resellers that the time to buy is now.  I’m sure there will be the usual procrastinators inside of there yet, but I think overall less.  I think that for every one person who buys one knowing that a set will soon be retired there will be another reseller buying two of to hopefully sell to the person that missed that time window.  If Lego stays on top of and consistent with their labeling of sets ‘retiring soon’ it will definitely start to take the steam out of the secondary market and make buying and holding a regular occurrence with the majority of sets.  (this is not meant to be a bubble thread)  I apologize in advance if it somehow evolves into that or an ethical debate.  Overall this doesn’t bother me, just one of those things I’ve given a moments thought to.
Get inspired with the LEGO DUPLO Creative Building Box! What will your little one create from a box of big and chunky LEGO DUPLO bricks? Start your stories with vacation-themed decorated bricks to help spark their imagination for open-ended building… more
➡ LEGO CITY VOLCANO SETS ON SALE: The LEGO City Volcano Exploration line is getting retired in favor of the recently released LEGO City Jungle Exploration theme, so most of the remaining LEGO City Volcano sets are now on sale. There are some really nice sets in the collection, like the #60125 LEGO City Volcano Heavy-Lift Helicopter, the #60124 LEGO City Volcano Exploration Base, the #60123 LEGO City Volcano Supply Helicopter, and the #60121 LEGO City Volcano Exploration Truck. You can find them under the LEGO City section, or just go to the Sales & Deals section of the Online LEGO Shop.
➡ #60098 LEGO CITY HEAVY-HAUL TRAIN: This set includes everything you need for a motorized LEGO train system; a heavy-haul train with 8-channel, 7-speed infrared remote control, hopper wagon, 2 flatbed wagons, helicopter, backhoe and a crane, plus 16 curved tracks, 12 straight tracks, and five minifigures. LEGO trains with a full package of LEGO Power Functions elements and the tracks are rare, and are always a great value, especially when they occasionally go on sale. Please note that this set is also marked as retiring soon. Regular Price: $199.99 – Sale price: $159.99 – BUY HERE
You can safely mark this multi-faceted set out as ‘one for the future’. Combining bits from the that’s-no-moon space stations from both Episode I and Episode III, this incredibly popular Death Star includes a massive 24 ‘minifigs’, a multitude of moving parts and classic set-piece areas like the trash compactor and the Emperor’s Throne Room. A fan favourite which, if you do a bit of internet detective work, you can still buy for a reasonable sum – in Lego terms at least.
The sets are still going to hang around until they’re out of stock, but once they’re gone that’s it. One thing this might help is the collectability of the sets after their shelf life runs out. There are some really cool Rogue One sets out there, but not everyone is going to get their hands on them.
I can give you some info. If you want a specific set check it weekly at the Lego store. It will get a retiring soon tag (not sold out or hard to get tags those are different). Past that check fan sites like this one, but don’t take anything said on them as the final truth.
Lego clearly wants to keep the history going as the Star Wars theme is consistently among the upper echelon of Lego themes in terms of the most sets coming out in a year. Part of this is due to the recent and planned theatrical releases of The Force Awakens, Rogue One, and The Last Jedi and, naturally, they still frequently draw from the first six movies in the franchise. Lego doesn’t stop there, however, as the animated shows Freemaker Adventures, Rebels, and Clone Wars all have sets that are not retired as of 2017. Eight movies and three television shows, that’s a lot of source material to choose from. What made it into our top ten list? Find out below.
Add a fearsome walker to your LEGO Star Wars First Order army with the Heavy Assault Walker. Turn the handle to aim the top-mounted rapid-fire stud shooter. LEGO Star Wars. Age Range. Measures over 13 (35cm) high, 13 (35cm) long and 4 (12cm) wide.
If you want to get rid of them fast, I would really suggest Craiglist first and be willing to take less. Preparing, listing, and selling items on eBay is a lot of work. If you have the time though, you can pace yourself and list 2-5 items per month. It may take you a year to sell everything, but you will get the best return. So it just depends. 🙂
@myscrnnm: On most tape-sealed LEGO boxes there is a printed production run code on one of the seals, e.g. XXS6 with XX being the week of production, with S being Europe and 6 being 2016 (or 2006). On glued boxes the code is embossed or, since recently on some sets, printed.
That’s a great deal, I got mine from Target too, and it was $29.99….was yours an online return? Because when the someone returns an item they bought online, the price is epically reduced, even if it is pristine condition.
Oh boy, how I wanted to have an AT-AT since I was a little kid. Even the protagonist And not only because they’re the “most heavily armored ground vehicle in the Imperial Army”, but because the lead character in E.T. had one as a toy!
The pile of legos included has an assortment of Lego Space pieces belonging to the mentioned sets and OTHER LEGOLAND SET PIECES of the same era. 6980 Galaxy Commander set. Lego Ideas magazine (incompl…
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